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Filed Pursuant to Rule 424(b)(5)
Registration No. 333-258378
CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE
Title of Each Class of Securities
to Be Registered
Amount to Be
Registered(1)
Proposed Maximum
Offering Price
Per Share(2)
Proposed Maximum
Aggregate Offering
Price(2)
Amount of
Registration Fee(3)
Class A ordinary shares, par value US$0.0001 per share(4)
115,000,000
US$15.18
US$1,745,700,000
US$190,455.87
(1)
Includes 15,000,000 Class A ordinary shares, par value US$0.0001 per share, offered to cover the underwriters’ option to purchase additional Class A ordinary shares. Goldman Sachs (Asia) L.L.C. has entered into a borrowing arrangement with Inspired Elite Investments Limited to facilitate the settlement of over-allocations, pursuant to which Goldman Sachs (Asia) L.L.C. may borrow up to 15,000,000 Class A ordinary shares from Inspired Elite Investments Limited.
(2)
Calculated based on an exchange rate of HK$7.7746 to US$1.00 as of March 31, 2021, as set forth in the H.10 statistical release of The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. The offering price is HK$118.00 per Class A ordinary share.
(3)
Calculated in accordance with Rules 456(b) and 457(r) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.
(4)
Includes all Class A ordinary shares in the Global Offering (as defined in this prospectus supplement under the caption “Underwriting”). Such Class A ordinary shares include those initially offered and sold within the United States, and those initially offered and sold outside the United States that may be resold from time to time within the United States. Offers and sales of Class A ordinary shares outside the United States are being made pursuant to applicable law. From time to time, such Class A ordinary shares may be represented by American depositary shares, or ADSs, issuable upon deposit of the Class A ordinary shares registered hereby, which have been registered under the registration statement on Form F-6 (File No. 333-240079) initially filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 24, 2020. Each such ADS represents two Class A ordinary shares.

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Prospectus Supplement
(To Prospectus dated August 2, 2021)
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Li Auto Inc.
100,000,000 Class A Ordinary Shares
We are offering 100,000,000 Class A ordinary shares, par value US$0.0001 per share, as part of a global offering, or the Global Offering, consisting of an international offering of 90,000,000 Class A ordinary shares, and a Hong Kong public offering of 10,000,000 Class A ordinary shares. The public offering price for the international offering and the Hong Kong public offering is HK$118.00 per Class A ordinary share, or US$15.18 per Class A ordinary share based on an exchange rate of HK$7.7746 to US$1.00.
Our American depositary shares, or ADSs, are listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol “LI.” On August 5, 2021, the last reported trading price of our ADSs on the Nasdaq Global Select Market was US$31.35 per ADS, or HK$121.87 per Class A ordinary share, based upon an exchange rate of HK$7.7746 to US$1.00. Each ADS represents two Class A ordinary shares.
The international offering contemplated herein consists of a U.S. offering and a non-U.S. offering made outside the United States in compliance with applicable law. We are paying a registration fee for Class A ordinary shares sold in the United States, as well as for Class A ordinary shares initially offered and sold outside the United States in the Global Offering that may be resold from time to time into the United States.
Approval-in-principle has been granted by The Stock Exchange of Hong Kong Limited, or the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, pursuant to the listing rules of the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, or the Hong Kong Listing Rules, for listing of, and permission to deal in, our Class A ordinary shares under the stock code “2015.”
See “Risk Factors” beginning on page S-27 of this prospectus supplement and in any documents incorporated by reference into this prospectus supplement for a discussion of certain risks that should be considered in connection with an investment in our Class A ordinary shares.
Neither the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined that this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus is accurate or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
PRICE HK$118.00 PER CLASS A ORDINARY SHARE
Per Class A
Ordinary Share
          Total          
Public offering price
   HK$118.00(1)
HK$11,800,000,000
Underwriting discounts and commissions(2)
   HK$1.829
HK$182,900,000
Proceeds to us (before expenses)(3)
   HK$116.171
HK$11,617,100,000
(1)
Equivalent to US$30.36 per ADS, based upon each ADS representing two Class A ordinary shares and an exchange rate of HK$7.7746 to US$1.00 as of March 31, 2021, as set forth in the H.10 statistical release of The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.
(2)
See “Underwriting” beginning on page S-72 of this prospectus supplement for additional information regarding total underwriting compensation.
(3)
Includes estimated net proceeds of HK$1,161,710,000 from the sale of 10,000,000 Class A ordinary shares in the Hong Kong public offering.
We have granted the international underwriters an option, exercisable by the joint global coordinators, on behalf of the international underwriters, to purchase up to an additional 15,000,000 Class A ordinary shares at the public offering price until 30 days after the last day for the lodging of applications under the Hong Kong public offering. Goldman Sachs (Asia) L.L.C. has entered into a borrowing arrangement with Inspired Elite Investments Limited to facilitate the settlement of over-allocations. Goldman Sachs (Asia) L.L.C. is obligated to return Class A ordinary shares to Inspired Elite Investments Limited by exercising the option to purchase additional Class A ordinary shares from us or by making purchases in the open market. No fees or other remuneration will be paid by the underwriters to us or Inspired Elite Investments Limited for the loan of these Class A ordinary shares.
The underwriters expect to deliver the Class A ordinary shares against payment therefor through the facilities of the Central Clearing and Settlement System on or around August 12, 2021.
Joint Sponsors, Joint Global Coordinators, Joint Bookrunners, and Joint Lead Managers
Goldman Sachs (Asia) L.L.C.
CICC
Financial Advisor, Joint Global Coordinator, Joint Bookrunner, and Joint Lead Manager
UBS Investment Bank
Joint Bookrunners and Joint Lead Managers
CLSABOCI CMBI FUTU
Prospectus Supplement dated August 6, 2021.

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CAPITALIZATION S-60
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You should rely only on the information contained or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus, or any other offering materials that we file with the SEC. We have not, Inspired Elite Investments Limited has not, and the underwriters have not, authorized any other person to provide you with different information. If anyone provides you with different or inconsistent information, you should not rely on it. None of the underwriters, Inspired Elite Investments Limited, or us is making an offer to sell the securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted. You should assume that the information appearing in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus, and the documents incorporated by reference is accurate only as of each of their respective dates. Our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects may have changed since those dates. Neither this prospectus supplement nor the accompanying prospectus constitutes an offer or an invitation on behalf of us or the underwriters to subscribe for and purchase any of the Class A ordinary shares, and they may not be used for or in connection with an offer or solicitation by anyone, in any jurisdiction in which such an offer or solicitation is not authorized or to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such an offer or solicitation.
 
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ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT
This document consists of two parts. The first part is this prospectus supplement, which describes the specific terms of the Global Offering and other matters relating to us and our financial condition. The second part, the base prospectus, presents more general information. The base prospectus was included in the registration statement on Form F-3 (File No. 333-258378) that we filed with the SEC on August 2, 2021 and has been updated since that time with additional information that is incorporated by reference. Generally, when we refer only to the “prospectus,” we are referring to both parts combined, and when we refer to the “accompanying prospectus,” we are referring to the base prospectus as updated through incorporation by reference.
If information in this prospectus supplement differs from information in the accompanying prospectus, you should rely on the information in this prospectus supplement.
Other than the Hong Kong public offering, no action is being taken in any jurisdiction outside the United States to permit a public offering of the Class A ordinary shares, and no action is being taken in any jurisdiction outside the United States to permit the possession or distribution of this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus in that jurisdiction. Persons who come into possession of this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus in jurisdictions outside the United States are required to inform themselves about and to observe any restrictions as to the Global Offering and the distribution of this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus applicable to that jurisdiction.
You should not consider any information in this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus to be investment, legal, or tax advice. You should consult your own counsel, accountants, and other advisors for legal, tax, business, financial, and related advice regarding the purchase of any of the securities offered by this prospectus supplement.
In this prospectus supplement, unless otherwise indicated or unless the context otherwise requires,

“ADAS” refers to advanced driver-assistance systems;

“ADSs” refers to the American depositary shares, each of which represents two Class A ordinary shares;

“BOM” refers to bill of materials;

“China” or “PRC” refers to the People’s Republic of China, excluding, for the purpose of this prospectus supplement only, Hong Kong, Macao, and Taiwan;

“Class A ordinary shares” refers to our Class A ordinary shares with a par value of US$0.0001 per share;

“Class B ordinary shares” refers to our Class B ordinary shares with a par value of US$0.0001 per share;

“Consolidated Affiliated Entities” refers to our VIEs and their subsidiaries;

“Hong Kong” refers to the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China;

“Hong Kong dollars” or “HK$” refers to the legal currency of Hong Kong;

“ICE” refers to internal combustion engine;

“HPC” refers to high-power charging;

“Listing” refers to the listing of the Class A ordinary shares on the Main Board of the Hong Kong Stock Exchange and “Listing Date” refers to the date, expected to be on or about August 12, 2021, on which the Class A ordinary shares are to be listed and on which dealings in the Class A ordinary shares are to be first permitted to take place on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange;
 
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“Li Auto,” “we,” “us,” “our company,” or “our” refers to Li Auto Inc., a Cayman Islands exempted company, and its subsidiaries and its VIEs and their respective subsidiaries, as the context requires;

“Macao” refers to the Macao Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China;

“Meituan” refers to Meituan, formerly known as Meituan Dianping, a company incorporated in the Cayman Islands and listed on the Main Board of the Hong Kong Stock Exchange;

“Mesh” refers to a new generation of vehicle cloud system, which enables inter-communication among the vehicle, the cloud, and the mobile application in a distributed grid;

“MPVs” refers to multi-purpose vehicles;

“MSRP” refers to manufacturer suggested retail price;

“NEDC” refers to New European Driving Cycle;

“NEVs” refers to new energy passenger vehicles, primarily including (i) “BEVs,” which refers to battery electric passenger vehicles, (ii) “EREVs,” which refers to extended-range electric passenger vehicles, (iii) “PHEVs,” which refers to plug-in hybrid electric passenger vehicles, and (iv) “FCEVs,” which refers to fuel-cell electric vehicles;

“NOA” refers to navigation on ADAS;

“ordinary shares” or “shares” refers to our Class A ordinary shares and Class B ordinary shares, par value US$0.0001 per share;

“Renminbi” or “RMB” refers to the legal currency of China;

“SUVs” refers to sport utility vehicles;

“U.S. dollars” or “US$” refers to the legal currency of the United States; and

“VIEs” refers to variable interest entities, and “our VIEs” refers to Beijing CHJ and Xindian Information.
Our reporting currency is Renminbi. Unless otherwise noted, all translations from Renminbi to U.S. dollars in this prospectus supplement are made at a rate of RMB6.5518 to US$1.00, the exchange rate in effect as of March 31, 2021 as set forth in the H.10 statistical release of The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. We make no representation that any Renminbi amounts could have been, or could be, converted into U.S. dollars at any particular rate, or at all. On July 30, 2021, the exchange rate was RMB6.4609 to US$1.00.
All discrepancies in any table between the amounts identified as total amounts and the sum of the amounts listed therein are due to rounding.
 
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WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION
We are subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, and, in accordance with the Exchange Act, we file annual reports and other information with the SEC. Information that we file with the SEC can be obtained over the internet at the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.
This prospectus supplement is part of a registration statement that we filed with the SEC, using a “shelf” registration process under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, relating to the securities to be offered. This prospectus supplement does not contain all of the information set forth in the registration statement, certain parts of which are omitted in accordance with the rules and regulations of the SEC. For further information with respect to Li Auto Inc. and the securities, reference is hereby made to the registration statement and the prospectus contained therein. The registration statement, including the exhibits thereto, may be inspected on the SEC’s website.
 
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INCORPORATION OF CERTAIN DOCUMENTS BY REFERENCE
The SEC allows us to “incorporate by reference” the information that we file with or submit to the SEC, which means that we can disclose important information to you by referring you to those documents that are considered part of this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus. Each document incorporated by reference is current only as of the date of such document, and the incorporation by reference of such documents should not create any implication that there has been no change in our affairs since such date. Information that we file with or submit to the SEC in the future and incorporate by reference will automatically update and supersede the previously filed information. See “Incorporation of Certain Documents by Reference” in the accompanying prospectus for more information. All of the documents incorporated by reference are available at www.sec.gov under Li Auto Inc., CIK number 0001791706.
We incorporate by reference the documents listed below in this prospectus supplement.

Our annual report on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 filed with the SEC on March 10, 2021 (File No. 001-39047), or our 2020 Form 20-F;

Our current report on Form 6-K furnished to the SEC on July 26, 2021, including Exhibit 99.1 titled “Li Auto Inc. Supplemental and Updated Disclosure,” or the Super 6-K, as amended; and

With respect to the offering of the securities under this prospectus supplement, all subsequent reports on Form 20-F, and any report on Form 6-K that indicates it (or any applicable portions thereof) is being incorporated by reference that we file with or furnish to the SEC on or after the date hereof and until the termination or completion of the offering by means of this prospectus supplement.
As you read the documents incorporated by reference, you may find inconsistencies in information from one document to another. If you find inconsistencies, you should rely on the statements made in the most recent document.
We will provide a copy of any or all of the information that has been incorporated by reference into the accompanying prospectus, other than exhibits to those documents unless such exhibits are specially incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement, upon written or oral request, to any person, including any beneficial owner of the securities, to whom a copy of this prospectus supplement is delivered, at no cost to such person. You may make such a request by writing or telephoning us at the following mailing address or telephone number:
Li Auto Inc.
11 Wenliang Street
Shunyi District, Beijing 101399
People’s Republic of China
+86 (10) 8742-7209
Attention: Investor Relations
 
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SPECIAL NOTES REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus, and the documents incorporated by reference may contain forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties and reflect our current expectations and views of future events. All statements other than statements of historical facts are forward-looking statements. These statements are made under the “safe harbor” provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. You can identify these forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “will,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “aim,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “estimate,” “is/are likely to,” “future,” “potential,” “continue,” or other similar expressions. We have based these forward-looking statements largely on our current expectations and projections about future events and financial trends that we believe may affect our financial condition, results of operations, business strategy, and financial needs. These forward-looking statements include statements relating to, among other things:

our goals and strategies;

our future business development, financial condition, and results of operations;

the expected outlook of the automotive market including the NEV market in China;

our expectations regarding demand for and market acceptance of our products;

our expectations regarding our relationships with customers, suppliers, third-party service providers, strategic partners, and other stakeholders;

competition in our industry;

our proposed use of proceeds;

relevant government policies and regulations relating to our industry;

general economic and business conditions globally and in China; and

assumptions underlying or related to any of the foregoing.
The forward-looking statements included in this prospectus supplement, in the accompanying prospectus, and in the documents incorporated by reference herein and therein are subject to risks, uncertainties, and assumptions about our company. Although we believe that our expectations expressed in these forward-looking statements are reasonable, our expectations may later be found to be incorrect. Our actual results of operations may differ materially from the forward-looking statements as a result of the risk factors disclosed in this prospectus supplement, in the accompanying prospectus, and in the documents incorporated by reference herein and therein. You should read thoroughly this prospectus supplement and the documents that we refer to with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from and worse than what we expect. We qualify all of our forward-looking statements by these cautionary statements.
This prospectus supplement contains certain data and information that we obtained from various government and private publications. Statistical data in these publications also include projections based on a number of assumptions. The automotive market or any segment thereof may not grow at the rate projected by market data, or at all. Failure of these markets or segments to grow at the projected rate may have a material and adverse effect on our business and the market price of our ADSs. In addition, the rapidly evolving nature of the NEV industry results in significant uncertainties for any projections or estimates relating to the growth prospects or future condition of our market. Furthermore, if any one or more of the assumptions underlying the market data are later found to be incorrect, actual results may differ from the projections based on these assumptions.
We would like to caution you not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. You should read these statements in conjunction with the risk factors disclosed herein, in the accompanying prospectus, and in the documents incorporated by reference herein and therein for a more complete discussion of the risks of an investment in our securities. We operate in a rapidly evolving environment. New risks emerge from time to time and it is impossible for our management to predict all risk factors, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or
 
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combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ from those contained in any forward-looking statement. We do not undertake any obligation to update or revise the forward-looking statements except as required under applicable law.
 
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PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT SUMMARY
The following summary is qualified in its entirety by, and should be read in conjunction with, the more detailed information and financial statements and notes thereto appearing elsewhere in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus, and the documents incorporated by reference herein and therein. In addition to this summary, we urge you to read the entire prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus, and the documents incorporated by reference carefully. Our 2020 Form 20-F, which contains our audited consolidated financial statements as of December 31, 2019 and 2020 and for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2019, and 2020, and the Super 6-K, as amended, are incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus. This prospectus supplement contains information from an industry report commissioned by us and prepared by China Insights Consultancy, or CIC, an independent research firm, to provide information regarding our industry. We refer to this report as the CIC Report.
Li Auto Inc.
Overview
We are an NEV (new energy passenger vehicles) automaker in China. We design, develop, manufacture, and sell premium smart electric vehicles. Through our product and technology, we provide families with safe and convenient products and services. We are a pioneer in successfully commercializing EREVs (extended-range electric passenger vehicle) in China. Our first and currently the only commercialized model, Li ONE, is a six-seat, large premium electric SUV (sport utility vehicle) equipped with a range extension system and advanced smart vehicle solutions. We started volume production of Li ONE in November 2019 and released the 2021 Li ONE on May 25, 2021. As of July 31, 2021, we delivered over 72,000 Li ONEs. In 2020, Li ONE ranked as the best-selling new energy SUV model in China with a 9.7% market share and ranked in the top six in China’s NEV market in terms of sales volume with a 2.8% market share, and we ranked as the eleventh among all the NEV brands in China in terms of sales volume, according to the CIC Report. The market size of China’s passenger vehicle market and NEV market in 2020 was 20.8 million and 1.2 million, respectively, according to the CIC Report. In 2020, the NEV sales volume accounted for 5.8% of the total passenger vehicle sales volume in China, and EREVs accounted for 2.8% of China’s NEV market in terms of sales volume, according to the CIC Report.
 
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The following diagram illustrates Li ONE’s certain features and specifications.
[MISSING IMAGE: tm2121015d3-tbl_lione4clr.jpg]
We are dedicated to serving the mobility needs of families in China. To this end, we strategically focus on NEVs within a price range of RMB200,000 (approximately US$31,000) to RMB500,000 (approximately US$76,000). As one of the most competitive SUV models in China, Li ONE has been well positioned to capture the huge growth opportunity of the SUV segment. With growing purchasing power, families in China tend to choose SUVs for daily commutes and weekend family trips. We believe that Li ONE offers our users the performance, functionality, and cabin-space of a large premium smart SUV while priced close to a compact premium SUV.
We believe that automotive technologies will continue to evolve, and as new technologies enable us to create more compelling products for users to address their needs, we evolve our products as well.

Our existing product, Li ONE, utilizes our proprietary EREV solution, which enables families to enjoy all the benefits of a premium SUV while free from range anxiety. We are developing our X platform, which succeeds the existing EREV platform for Li ONE and is equipped with our next-generation EREV powertrain system. We plan to launch the first product on our X platform, a full-size premium extended-range electric SUV, in 2022, and to launch two additional SUVs on our X platform in 2023.

We are investing heavily in the HPC (High-power Charging) BEV technologies. We focus on developing our BEVs with ultra-fast charging capability, or HPC BEVs, which we believe will deliver superior charging experience. Charging under our planned HPC network will be faster, cheaper, and more accessible. We are developing two platforms, Whale and Shark, for our future HPC BEVs. Starting from 2023, we plan to launch at least two new HPC BEV models each year.
 
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We believe that Level 4* autonomous driving will be the primary operating model for all vehicles in the foreseeable future. We are investing significantly in our proprietary autonomous driving technologies. Starting from 2022, all our new vehicle models will be equipped with necessary hardware compatible with in-house developed, future Level 4 autonomous driving as a standard configuration, and we will continue to optimize our autonomous driving solutions leveraging our full-stack proprietary software development capabilities.
The following diagram illustrates the development roadmap with the expected time of delivery of our future electric vehicle models.
[MISSING IMAGE: tm2121015d11-ph_platform4c.jpg]
Since our inception, we have been leveraging technologies to create value for our users. We have invested in in-car technologies to provide joyful driving and riding experiences for families. We have developed our signature four-display interactive system, full-coverage in-car voice control system, and autonomous driving technologies. Furthermore, our utilization of FOTA (firmware over-the-air) upgrades, a technology that updates vehicle firmware and software remotely through cloud network, enables us to introduce additional functionality and improve vehicle performance continuously throughout the entire vehicle lifecycle.
Leveraging the know-how accumulated from our delivery and servicing of Li ONEs, we plan to equip our new vehicle models with optimized software (such as control algorithm) and hardware (new EREV and HPC BEV powertrain systems) as well as enhanced NVH performance. In addition, the planned adoption of high-voltage platform in our future HPC BEV models could further enhance their driving range by reducing energy consumption. Furthermore, our intelligent cockpit and autonomous driving technologies have been designed with expandability and transferability across models, which allow us to smoothly migrate our design language, interaction experience, and integrated systems into our future models to further improve the intelligence level of all future models.
We have digitalized our user interactions and established our own direct sales and servicing network to continuously improve operating efficiency. With our integrated online and offline platform, we can achieve higher efficiency in sales and marketing than automakers that rely on third-party
*
According to CIC, the Society of Automotive Engineers categorizes autonomous driving into six levels ranging from Level 0 to Level 5, which mainly refer to the different level of involvement of system regarding execution of steering and acceleration (or deceleration), monitoring of driving environment, and fallback performance of dynamic driving task. For Level 0 (no driving automation), there is no system involvement. For Level 1 (driver assistance), system involves in execution of steering and acceleration (or deceleration) only under certain conditions. For Level 2 (partial driving automation), system involves in execution of steering and acceleration (or deceleration) when required by human drivers. For Level 3 (conditional driving automation), system involves in execution of steering and acceleration (or deceleration) and monitoring of driving environment. For Level 4 (high driving automation), system involves in execution of steering and acceleration (or deceleration), monitoring of driving environment, and fallback performance of dynamic driving task under certain conditions. For Level 5 (full driving automation), there is no human involvement and the system takes full control. For different levels of autonomous driving, see “Industry Overview—The Future Trend: Smart Vehicles.”
 
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dealerships to reach customers. In particular, we have developed a data-driven, closed-loop digital platform to manage all user interactions from sales leads to test drives to purchases and even to user reviews, which enables us to significantly reduce user acquisition costs.
Quality is essential to our business. We manufacture in-house and collaborate with industry- leading suppliers to ensure the high quality of our vehicles. We have built our own manufacturing base in Changzhou, Jiangsu Province, China, which allows our engineering and manufacturing teams to seamlessly collaborate with each other and streamline the feedback loop for rapid product enhancements and quality improvements. We have also implemented strict quality control protocols and measurements for selecting and managing our suppliers. As of March 31, 2021, Li ONE was the only large SUV that has received top ratings under all of the China Insurance Automotive Safety Index (C-IASI), the China Automobile Health Index (C-AHI), and the China-New Car Assessment Program (C-NCAP), according to the CIC Report.
The Challenges Facing China’s NEV Market
We believe that smart electric vehicles represent a trend of the automotive industry. China is both the largest passenger vehicle market and the largest NEV market in the world as measured by sales volume. China’s NEV market is currently skewed towards BEVs, as 81.1% of the NEVs sold in China in 2020 were BEVs, according to the CIC Report. However, the development of NEVs in China is currently facing one fundamental challenge: the inconvenience of energy replenishment. The inconvenience of, and lengthy time needed for, BEVs’ charging solutions cause range anxiety, which limits use cases and impedes the wider acceptance of BEVs in China. As a result, sales volume of BEVs represents only 4.7% of sales volume of total passenger vehicle in 2020, according to the CIC Report.
China faces a problem of inadequate private and public fast charging infrastructure. The development of private charging infrastructure is affected by factors such as limited residential parking space in cities with high population density, low percentages of residential parking space suitable for installing home charging stalls, and power grid capacity limits in aged residential areas. As of December 31, 2020, fewer than 25% of families in first-tier cities in China had parking space suitable for installing home charging stalls, compared with over 70% of families in the United States, according to the CIC Report. As a result, a substantial number of BEV owners in China have to rely on public charging infrastructure. As of December 31, 2020, the ratio of NEV parc to public fast charging stalls was 15.9 to 1, according to the CIC Report. This demonstrates the insufficient number of public fast charging stalls in China to support the growth of BEVs.
In addition, existing charging solutions are time-consuming and have always troubled BEV owners as they usually take between 30 minutes and 60 minutes to charge a BEV. Considering the additional waiting time, the total time for waiting and charging is longer than consumers’ expectation and thus causes inconvenience to consumers.
Our Solution
To address the challenge facing China’s NEV market, any NEV energy replenishment solution must be at least as convenient and efficient as an ICE vehicle (a vehicle powered by internal combustion engine) energy replenishment solution and also must demonstrate commercial viability. We have developed an EREV solution and are also investing in the HPC BEV solution as both solutions could provide users with convenient energy replenishment experience that is comparable to ICE vehicles.
 
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The following diagram illustrates our EREV powertrain and the difference between EREVs as compared to PHEVs, BEVs, and ICE vehicles.
[MISSING IMAGE: tm2121015d3-ph_power4c.jpg]
EREV Solution
We have developed our proprietary EREV technologies and applied them to our first model, Li ONE.
An EREV is purely electric-driven by its electric motor, but its energy source and power come from both its battery pack and range extension system. A range extension system generates electricity with a dedicated ICE designed with high fuel consumption efficiency, an electric generator, and a speed reducer to connect them. Our Li ONE electric propulsion system consists of a 145-kilowatt rear-drive electric motor, a 100-kilowatt front-drive electric motor, and a 40.5-kilowatt-hour battery pack, which supports an electrically powered NEDC range of 188 kilometers. Li ONE’s range extension system consists of a 1.2-liter turbo-charged engine configured and fine-tuned for EREV purpose, a 100-kilowatt electric generator, and a 55-liter fuel tank. With its integrated powertrain system, Li ONE delivers a total NEDC range of 1,080 kilometers and energy efficiency of 6.05 liters per 100 kilometers or 17.7 kilowatt-hours per 100 kilometers, depending on its driving mode.
Li ONE’s energy can be replenished by slow charging, fast charging, and refueling. Li ONE can operate even when users have no access to charging infrastructure, thereby completely eliminating range anxiety. Benefiting from its all-electric-driven propulsion, Li ONE offers a similarly high-quality driving experience to that of BEVs, such as smooth acceleration (acceleration from zero to 100 kilometers- per-hour in 6.5 seconds) and superior NVH performance. The overall energy consumption level of Li ONE is much lower than that of ICE vehicles in a similar class, as a result of its high energy efficiency range extension system. In addition, in certain cities in China, our Li ONE users can also benefit from vehicle-related tax exemptions in China and local government policies in favor of NEVs, such as no
 
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quota limitations for vehicle license plate application and exemption from traffic restrictions, although Li ONEs sold in Beijing and Shanghai cannot enjoy the exemptions from the license plate restrictions. See “Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Our Business and Industry—Changes in PRC government policies that are favorable for NEVs or domestically manufactured vehicles could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects.”
Our next-generation EREV platform can support longer range, higher thermal efficiency, and better NVH performance. It further enhances integration of the range extension system and the electric motors to support higher electric power output and better acceleration performance. It leverages a world- class chassis to support a larger vehicle body and provide optimal driving experience and superior vehicle passing capability.
Despite the advancement of BEV technologies, potential development of charging infrastructure, and the uncertainty of changes in existing policies promulgated by local government on EREVs, the EREV market in the long run is still expected to grow significantly. Although both EREVs and BEVs with ultra-fast charging may eliminate range anxiety, the popularity of EREVs is still sustainable given that EREVs can provide longer travel distances per energy refuel and allow for more flexibility for refueling. Furthermore, the coverage of charging infrastructure of BEVs in rural areas or areas with lower population density may not be sufficient in the near future, which places EREVs in a more competitive position in these areas. Consequently, the sales volume of EREVs is expected to increase from 0.03 million in 2020 to 0.4 million in 2025, which is expected to account for 7.3% of the total NEV sales volume in 2025, according to the CIC report.
With the unique capabilities and features, we believe that our EREV technologies will help accelerate the adoption of electric vehicles in China and contribute to China’s national initiatives to build a low-carbon-emission society.
HPC BEV Solution
As next-generation electric vehicle technologies continue to advance, we believe that it is the right time to introduce an HPC BEV platform and future HPC BEV models. A number of ultra-fast charging technologies such as high C-rate battery, high-voltage platform, and HPC network, have emerged. We have been investing in the technology advancement in these areas and plan to develop ultra-fast charging solutions, which aim to effectively address the inconvenience of energy replenishment for BEVs. We plan to develop a high C-rate battery to balance the cost, longevity, safety, and charging and discharging rate. We are also developing key parts of the high-voltage platform, such as a high-voltage air compressor. To facilitate commercialization of our HPC BEVs, we plan to deploy an HPC network that consists of ultra-fast charging stations. Starting from 2023, we plan to launch at least two new HPC BEV models each year. As a new entrant into the BEV market, we believe our proven product defining capability, as substantiated by the track record of developing and delivering Li ONE, deep understanding of the needs of families, and wide recognition of our brand and products provide a solid foundation for competing with peer BEV manufacturers. We also believe our HPC BEVs, which will be empowered by the next-generation electric vehicle technologies developed with our strong research and development capabilities, will also significantly improve charging efficiency and thereby effectively eliminate range anxiety, improve driving experience, and differentiate us from our competitors. Our existing research and development capabilities and accumulated know-how for EREVs, which we are leveraging in developing BEVs in areas such as autonomous driving, control algorithm, and electric-driven system, would also serve as our competitive advantage. We strategically plan to expand our product line to launch both EREV and BEV models within our target price range so as to build a solid brand trusted by families.
Competitive Landscape
The China automotive market is highly competitive. In 2020, there were 131 automobile brands with passenger vehicles delivered in China. China has also become the world’s largest market for NEVs, which are categorized by the PRC government into BEVs, PHEVs (including EREVs), and FCEVs. In 2020, the NEV sales volume only accounted for 5.8% of the total passenger vehicle sales volume, indicating massive future growth potential. Li ONE is the first successfully commercialized EREV in China
 
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and defines a new market segment in China with huge growth potential. In 2020, Li ONE was the best- selling new energy SUV, which is the only EREV among the top 10 best-selling new energy SUVs, and was the sixth best-selling NEV.
We strategically focus on NEVs within a price range of RMB200,000 (approximately US$31,000) to RMB500,000 (approximately US$76,000), and we compete with both ICE vehicles and all kinds of NEVs (including BEVs, PHEVs, FCEVs) in the same price range. We believe that our vehicles compete with premium vehicles regardless of powertrain technologies. We believe that the primary competitive factors in our markets are: technological innovation, product quality and safety, product pricing, sales efficiency, manufacturing efficiency, branding, and design and styling. We believe that positive factors pertaining to our competitive position include precise consumer targeting and product defining capabilities, innovative designs and technologies, manufacturing cost management, distribution cost management, and general management efficiency as a company. In 2020, the first full year after Li ONE’s mass production in November 2019, Li ONE ranked as the best-selling new energy SUV model in China with a 9.7% market share and ranked in the top six in China’s NEV market in terms of sales volume with a 2.8% market share, and we ranked as the eleventh among all the NEV brands in China in terms of sales volume, according to the CIC Report. Our extraordinary product defining capability enables us to design Li ONE in anticipation of the Chinese families’ demand for SUVs while balancing performance, configurations, costs, and technologies. We also believe that the current technology advancement towards the next-generation electric vehicles provides us with a unique opportunity to compete with existing BEV players because such technology advancement is tantamount to a fresh development of a brand new technology. The current mainstream BEV charging infrastructure operates on a 400- voltage platform and usually takes between 30 and 60 minutes to fully charge a BEV. The next- generation charging infrastructure is expected to operate on an 800-voltage platform and still requires significant commitment in research and development and investments in brand-new charging stations compared to the current charging infrastructure. We have been investing in next-generation electric vehicle technologies including high C-rate battery pack, high-voltage platform, and HPC network. We believe that our investment and progress in the research and development of the next-generation electric vehicle technologies is in line with major existing BEV players. We expect our HPC BEVs to be equipped with the next-generation electric vehicle technologies developed with our strong research and development capabilities, with significantly improved charging efficiency reducing the charging time to between 10 and 15 minutes after 2023, and thereby effectively eliminate range anxiety, improve driving experience, and differentiate us from our competitors.
See “Item 3.D. Key Information—Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Our Business and Industry—We may not be successful in the highly competitive China automotive market” in our 2020 Form 20-F for risks related to competition in our industry.
Our Market Opportunities
China has become the world’s largest NEV market. In recent years, the PRC government has provided great support and implemented various favorable policies to drive the development of the NEV market. In addition, with the rapid advancement of NEV technology, growing environmental awareness of consumers, and increasing acceptance of NEVs, the growth of NEV sales volume has surpassed that of the ICE vehicles in China. According to the CIC Report, the NEV sales volume increased from 0.6 million in 2017 to 1.2 million in 2020, representing 5.8% of the total passenger vehicle sales volume in 2020, indicating massive future growth potential. The NEV market size is expected to grow from 2020 to 2025 at a CAGR of 35.8%, compared to a CAGR of 4.0% during the same period for passenger vehicle market size. The New Energy Vehicle Industry Development Plan (2021-2035) issued by the MIIT in October 2020 has set China’s target NEV sales volume to be around 20% of total vehicle sales volume by 2025. In 2020, Li ONE ranked the sixth in China’s NEV market in terms of sales volume with a 2.8% market share, according to the CIC Report. We ranked the third among the automakers that solely manufacture NEVs in terms of sales volume in 2020, according to the CIC Report.
 
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Our Strengths
We believe that the following strengths contribute to our success and differentiate us from our competitors:

Extraordinary and trend-setting product defining capability
We started the volume production of Li ONE in November 2019 and delivered over 72,000 Li ONEs as of July 31, 2021. In 2020, Li ONE ranked as the best-selling new energy SUV model in China, according to the CIC Report. The success of Li ONE demonstrates our insight into user demand and our extraordinary product defining capabilities, which lay a solid foundation for the development of future models, including both EREV and BEV models.

Proprietary EREV and BEV technologies
Our proprietary range extension system enables users to enjoy all the benefits of an electric vehicle while freeing them from the range anxiety typically associated with BEVs. The solid delivery record of Li ONE demonstrates our capability to successfully leverage EREV technologies to deliver the superior performance and functionalities in our product designing. The technologies and experience we accumulated will accelerate the development of our X, Whale, and Shark platforms and empower the development of our future platforms.

Smart vehicle solutions delivering superior user experience
Capitalizing on advanced technologies in the industry, we have developed proprietary smart vehicle solutions to significantly enhance our user experience. Our high-performance Qualcomm 820A platform, Android-Linux dual system for in-car interactive controls, signature four-display interactive system, full-coverage in-car voice control system, FOTA upgrades, and cloud capability all deliver superior user experience, and the 2021 Li ONEs are equipped with NOA as a standard configuration.

High efficiency in sales and marketing
We have developed our own integrated online and offline platform to interact directly with users. With fully digitalized processes and continuous data-drive optimization, we have achieved much high efficiency in sales and marketing than automakers that rely on third-party dealerships to reach customers. We have established our own direct sales and servicing network, and our high sales and marketing efficiency allowed us to achieve profitability at a relatively early stage.

Effective quality control capabilities
Quality is essential to our business. We have built our own Changzhou manufacturing base, which allows us to implement strict quality control protocols and measurements throughout the manufacturing process. We apply rigorous standards in the vehicle development and validation process and work with world-class suppliers with high quality standards.

Combination of expertise from automotive, smart device, and internet industries
Our team has tremendous experience in their areas of expertise. The senior members of our teams come from traditional and smart automotive, smart device, and internet industries. They collaborate closely and complement each other to drive innovations within our company.
Our Strategies
We aim to become a leading player in China’s NEV market. We provide families with safe, convenient, and refined products and services. We aspire to create a sustainable path for everyone to embrace vehicle electrification. We intend to pursue the following strategies to achieve our mission:

Continue to innovate in electrification and successfully launch future EREV and BEV models
We will continue to develop new NEV models with best-in-class performance. We plan to introduce a next-generation EREV platform in our three new vehicles planned for 2022 and 2023.
 
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We are investing in the research and development of next-generation electric vehicle technologies including high C-rate battery, high-voltage platform, and ultra-fast charging technologies. Leveraging these technologies, we are developing two platforms, Whale and Shark, for our future HPC BEVs. Starting from 2023, we plan to launch at least two new HPC BEV models each year.

Continue to innovate in vehicle intelligence and autonomous driving
We are dedicated to continuously improving the driving experience of our users and delivering superior Level 4 autonomous driving to users. We intend to continue to enhance our smart-vehicle solutions, and invest in progressive technologies and proprietary smart vehicle solutions. We plan to further enhance our Level 2 autonomous driving currently equipped on our vehicles and equip our future models with necessary hardware compatible with in-house developed, future Level 4 autonomous driving as a standard configuration.

Further expand sales network and optimize efficiency
We plan to expand to broader regions across China to reach new prospective users. We also plan to optimize our sales and marketing efficiency by leveraging our integrated online and offline platforms. In addition, we will continue to strengthen our digitalized system to integrate and connect all stages of the vehicle sales and servicing process to achieve higher efficiency in sales and marketing.

Continue to pursue operational excellence and cost improvement
We believe that ensuring the quality of the software in vehicles is of increased importance. We intend to allocate a larger proportion of our development efforts to improving software quality while continuing to incrementally improve our vehicle hardware. Meanwhile, we will continue to optimize our costs of operation by following a design-for-cost philosophy and minimizing personalized configuration options to achieve the highest possible economies of scale.
Summary of Risk Factors
Investing in our Class A ordinary shares involves significant risks. You should carefully consider all of the information in this prospectus supplement before making an investment in our Class A ordinary shares. Below please find a summary of the principal risks we face, organized under relevant headings. These risks are discussed more fully in the section titled “Risk factors.”
Risks Relating to Our Business and Industry

We have a limited operating history and face significant challenges as a new entrant into our industry.

Our ability to develop, manufacture, and deliver automobiles of high quality and appeal to users, on schedule, and on a large scale is unproven and still evolving.

We currently depend on revenues generated from a single model of vehicles and in the foreseeable future from a limited number of models.

We are subject to risks associated with EREVs.

We recorded net losses and had negative net cash flows from operations in the past, and we have not been profitable, which may continue in the future.

Our vehicles may not perform in line with user expectations and may contain defects.

We may not be successful in the highly competitive China automotive market.

We may not succeed in continuing to establish, maintain, and strengthen our brand, and our brand and reputation could be harmed by negative publicity with respect to us, our directors, officers, employees, shareholders, peers, business partners, or our industry in general.

Our research and development efforts may not yield the results as expected.
 
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We could experience disruptions in supply of raw materials or components used in our vehicles from our suppliers, some of which are our single-source suppliers for the components they supply.

Orders for Li ONE may be canceled by users despite their deposit payment and online confirmation.
Risks Relating to Our Corporate Structure
We are also subject to risks and uncertainties related to our corporate structure, including, but not limited to, the following:

We are a Cayman Islands holding company with no equity ownership in our VIEs and we conduct our operations in China through (i) our PRC subsidiaries and (ii) our VIEs with which we have maintained contractual arrangements. Investors in our Class A ordinary shares or the ADSs thus are not purchasing equity interest in our VIEs in China but instead are purchasing equity interest in a Cayman Islands holding company. If the PRC government deems that our contractual arrangements with our VIEs do not comply with PRC regulatory restrictions on foreign investment in the relevant industries, or if these regulations or the interpretation of existing regulations change in the future, we could be subject to severe penalties or be forced to relinquish our interests in those operations. Our holding company in the Cayman Islands, our VIEs, and investors of our company face uncertainty about potential future actions by the PRC government that could affect the enforceability of the contractual arrangements with our VIEs and, consequently, significantly affect the financial performance of our VIEs and our company as a group.

We rely on contractual arrangements with our VIEs and their respective shareholders to exercise control over our business, which may not be as effective as direct ownership in providing operational control.

Our ability to enforce the equity pledge agreements between us and our VIEs’ shareholders may be subject to limitations based on PRC laws and regulations.
Risks Relating to Doing Business in China
We face risks and uncertainties related to doing business in China in general, including, but not limited to, the following:

The PRC government has significant authority to exert influence on the ability of a China-based company, such as us, to conduct its business. Therefore, investors of our company and our business face potential uncertainty from the PRC government. Changes in China’s economic, political or social conditions or government policies could have a material and adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

The approval of the CSRC or other PRC government authorities may be required in connection with this offering under PRC law, and, if required, we cannot predict whether or for how long we will be able to obtain such approval and, even if we obtain such CSRC approval, the approval could be rescinded. Any failure to obtain or delay in obtaining the CSRC approval for this offering, or a rescission of such CSRC approval if obtained by us, would subject us to sanctions imposed by the CSRC or other PRC regulatory authorities.

Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of PRC laws and regulations could limit the legal protections available to you and us.

We may be adversely affected by the complexity, uncertainties, and changes in PRC regulations on automotive as well as internet-related businesses and companies.

Our ADSs may be delisted under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act if the PCAOB is unable to inspect auditors who are located in China. The delisting of our ADSs, or the threat of their being delisted, may materially and adversely affect the value of your investment. Additionally, the inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections deprives our investors with the benefits of such inspections.
 
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Risks Relating to Our Class A Ordinary Shares and ADSs
Risks and uncertainties related to our Class A Ordinary shares and ADSs include, but are not limited to, the following:

The trading price of our ADSs has been and may be, and the trading price of our Class A ordinary shares can be, volatile, which could result in substantial losses to investors.

Our dual-class voting structure will limit your ability to influence corporate matters and could discourage others from pursuing any change of control transactions that holders of our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs may view as beneficial.

Certain principal shareholders have substantial influence over our key corporate matters and will continue to have such influence following the Global Offering.
Risks Relating to the Global Offering and the Dual Listing
Risks and uncertainties related to the Global Offering and the dual listing include, but are not limited to, the following:

An active trading market for our Class A ordinary shares on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange might not develop or be sustained and trading prices of our Class A ordinary shares might fluctuate significantly.

Since there will be a gap of several days between pricing and trading of our Class A ordinary shares, the price of our ADSs traded on the Nasdaq Global Select Market may fall during this period and could result in a fall in the price of our Class A ordinary shares to be traded on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.

The characteristics of the U.S. capital markets and the Hong Kong capital markets are different.
Corporate History and Structure
We were founded in April 2015 by our founder, Mr. Xiang Li. In April 2017, we incorporated CHJ Technologies Inc. under the laws of the Cayman Islands as our offshore holding company to facilitate offshore financing, which later changed its name to Leading Ideal Inc. in April 2019 and further to Li Auto Inc. in July 2020.
In May 2017, Li Auto Inc. established Leading Ideal HK Limited, formerly known as CHJ Technologies (Hong Kong) Limited, as its intermediary holding company. In May 2017, Leading Ideal HK Limited established a wholly-owned PRC subsidiary, Jiangsu Xindian Interactive Sales and Services Co., Ltd., or Xindian Interactive, to engage in sales and after sales management. In December 2017, Leading Ideal HK Limited established a wholly-owned PRC subsidiary, Beijing Co Wheels Technology Co., Ltd., or Wheels Technology, to engage in the research and development of smart connectivity functions and ADAS as well as general administration of the group. Leading Ideal HK Limited later established wholly-owned PRC subsidiaries to serve various functions, including Leading (Xiamen) Private Equity Investment Co., Ltd. and Beijing Leading Automobile Sales Co., Ltd., or Chongqing Lixiang.
In December 2018, we acquired Chongqing Lifan Automobile Co., Ltd., and later changed its name to Chongqing Zhizao Automobile Co., Ltd.
In July 2019, Li Auto Inc. gained control over Beijing CHJ Information Technology Co., Ltd., or Beijing CHJ, one of our VIEs, through Wheels Technology by entering into a series of contractual arrangements with Beijing CHJ and its shareholders. Wheels Technology also entered into a series of contractual arrangements with the other one of our VIEs, Beijing Xindian Transport Information Technology Co., Ltd., or Xindian Information, and its shareholders in April 2019. The contractual arrangements with Beijing CHJ and Xindian Information were subsequently amended and restated, most recently in April 2021. We conduct certain of our business in China through our VIEs based on these contractual arrangements, but the shareholders of our VIEs may have interests that conflict with us.
 
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The revenue contribution of our VIEs and their subsidiaries, taking into account all of their respective business with or without foreign investment restrictions under PRC laws, amounted to approximately 0%, 1%, 1%, and 0% of our total revenues in 2018, 2019, and 2020 and for the three months ended March 31, 2021, respectively. The revenue contribution of the businesses of our VIEs and their subsidiaries with foreign investment restrictions under PRC laws, being the provision of value-added communication services, radio and television production activities and operation of commercial internet culture activities, amounted to RMB2.4 thousand (US$0.4 thousand) during 2018, 2019, 2020, and the three months ended March 31, 2021.
In October 2019, Beijing CHJ established Chongqing Lixiang Automobile Co., Ltd., or Chongqing Lixiang.
In December 2019, we disposed of all of our equity interests in Chongqing Zhizao Automobile Co., Ltd.
On July 30, 2020, our ADSs commenced trading on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol “LI.” We raised, from our initial public offering and from the underwriters’ full exercise of the option to purchase additional ADSs, approximately US$1.2 billion in net proceeds after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering expenses paid by us.
In December 2020, we completed a public offering of 54,050,000 ADSs representing 108,100,000 Class A ordinary shares and raised approximately US$1.5 billion in net proceeds.
Since our inception, we have been leveraging technologies to create value for our users. We commenced research and development of our vehicle models and in-car technologies in April 2015. Our first model, Li ONE, started volume production in November 2019 and as of July 31, 2021, we have delivered over 72,000 Li ONEs.
Our founder, Mr. Xiang Li, has over 20 years of experience founding and managing internet technology companies in China, including over 13 years of experience focusing on the automobile industry.
 
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The following diagram illustrates our corporate structure, including our principal subsidiaries and our VIEs, as of the date of this prospectus supplement:
[MISSING IMAGE: tm2121015d1-fc_offshorebw.jpg]
Notes:
(1)
Include Shanghai Lixiang Automobile Technology Co., Ltd., Beijing Lixiang Automotive Co., Ltd., Chehejia (Xiamen) Investment Co., Ltd., Lixiang Zhizao Automotive Services (Xiamen) Co., Ltd., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Chehejia (Xiamen) Investment Co., Ltd., and Shanghai Yizhinan Technology Co., Ltd.
(2)
Include Zhejiang Lixiang Automoble Co., Ltd., Chehejia Financial Technology (Jiangsu) Co., Ltd., Beijing Xindian Intelligent Technology Co., Ltd., and Chongqing Xinfan Machinary Co., Ltd., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Beijing Xindian Intelligent Technology Co., Ltd.
Contractual Arrangements
We operate or may operate in certain industries that are subject to restrictions under current PRC laws and regulations. In order to comply with such laws, while availing ourselves of international capital markets and maintaining effective control over all of our operations, we control our Consolidated Affiliated Entities, which include our VIEs and their subsidiaries, through the contractual Arrangements entered into on April 21, 2021. Hence, we do not directly own any equity interest in our Consolidated Affiliated Entities. Pursuant to the contractual arrangements, we have effective control over the financial and operational policies of our Consolidated Affiliated Entities and are entitled to all the economic benefits derived from the Consolidated Affiliated Entities’ operations. For further details, please see “Item 4.A. Information on the Company—History and Development of the Company” and “Item 4.C. Information on the Company—Organizational Structure” in our 2020 Form 20-F, as well as other documents that are incorporated by reference into this prospectus supplement.
 
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The following simplified diagram illustrates the flow of economic benefits from our Consolidated Affiliated Entities to our company stipulated under the contractual arrangements:
[MISSING IMAGE: tm2121015d1-fc_companybw.jpg]
Notes:
(1)
Beijing CHJ is owned by Mr. Xiang Li as to 90.27%, Mr. Yanan Shen as to 5.08% and Mr. Tie Li as to 4.65%.
(2)
Xindian Information is owned by Mr. Xiang Li as to 74%, Mr. Zheng Fan as to 12.92%, Mr. Yanan Shen as to 3.78%. Mr. Tie Li as to 3.46%, Mr. Zhi Qin as to 1.89%, Mr. Qinghua Liu as to 1.09%, Mr. Wei Wei as to 0.46%, Mr. Gang Song as to 0.43%, Mr. Qian Ye as to 0.02% and Mr. Bo Xu as to 1.95%.
(3)
“—>“ denotes direct legal and beneficial ownership in the equity interest.
(4)
“--->“ denotes contractual relationship.
(5)
“----” denotes the control by WFOE over the Registered Shareholders and our VIEs through (i) powers of attorney to exercise all shareholders’ rights in our VIEs; (ii) exclusive call options to acquire all or part of the equity interests in our VIEs; and (iii) equity pledges over the equity interests in our VIEs.
(6)
These include certain companies which do not currently carry out any business operations but intend to carry out businesses which are subject to foreign investment restrictions in accordance with the 2020 Negative List.
(7)
50% of the equity interest in Chongqing Lixiang is held by Beijing CHJ and the remaining 50% is indirectly held by us. For details of the subsidiaries of our VIEs, see “Corporate History and Structure.”
Our Controlling Shareholders
Immediately after the completion of the Global Offering, Mr. Xiang Li, our founder, chairman of the board, and chief executive officer, will beneficially own and will control, through his intermediaries, an aggregate of 355,812,080 Class B ordinary shares and 108,557,400 Class A ordinary shares with one vote per share which are subject to certain restrictions, or the CEO Award Shares, representing (a) approximately 22.63% of our issued Shares; (b) approximately 69.59% of the voting rights in our company with respect to shareholder resolutions relating to matters other than certain reserved matters, and (c) approximately 18.63% with respect to shareholder resolutions relating to certain reserved matters Mr. Li holds his interests in our company through Amp Lee Ltd., which is wholly owned by Cyric Point Enterprises Limited, the entire interest of which is in turn held by a trust that was established by Mr. Li (as the settlor) for the benefit of himself and his family. Therefore Mr. Li will be a controlling shareholder of our company after the Listing. See “Principal Shareholders” for further details.
Implications of Being a Controlled Company
We are, and following the completion of the Global Offering, will continue to be a “controlled company” as defined under the Nasdaq Stock Market Rules because Mr. Xiang Li, our founder, chairman, and chief executive officer, beneficially owns all of our then issued and outstanding Class B
 
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ordinary shares and holds more than 50% of the voting power for the election of directors. As a “controlled company,” we are permitted to elect not to comply with certain corporate governance requirements.
Implications of Being a Foreign Private Issuer
We are a foreign private issuer within the meaning of the rules under the Exchange Act, and as such we are exempt from certain provisions of the securities rules and regulations in the United States that are applicable to U.S. domestic issuers. Moreover, the information we are required to file with or furnish to the SEC will be less extensive and less timely compared to that required to be filed with the SEC by U.S. domestic issuers. In addition, as a company incorporated in the Cayman Islands, we are permitted to adopt certain home country practices in relation to corporate governance matters that differ significantly from the Nasdaq Global Select Market corporate governance listing standards. These practices may afford less protection to shareholders than they would enjoy if we complied fully with the Nasdaq Global Select Market corporate governance listing standards.
Public Offering and Listing in Hong Kong
We are offering 100,000,000 Class A ordinary shares, par value US$0.0001 per share, as part of a Global Offering, consisting of an international offering of 90,000,000 Class A ordinary shares offered hereby, and a Hong Kong public offering of 10,000,000 Class A ordinary shares. The international offering contemplated herein consists of a U.S. offering and a non-U.S. offering made outside the U.S. in accordance with applicable law. We are paying a registration fee for ordinary shares sold in the United States, as well as for Class A ordinary shares initially offered and sold outside the United States in the Global Offering that may be resold from time to time in the United States.
Approval-in-principle has been granted by the Hong Kong Stock Exchange pursuant to the Hong Kong Listing Rules for listing of, and permission to deal in, our Class A ordinary shares under the stock code “2015.”
Fungibility and Exchanges Between ADSs and Class A Ordinary Shares
In connection with the Hong Kong public offering, and to facilitate fungibility and conversion between ADSs and Class A ordinary shares and trading between the Nasdaq Global Select Market and the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, we intend to move a portion of our issued Class A ordinary shares from our Cayman share register to our Hong Kong share register.
In addition, all Class A ordinary shares offered in both the international offering and the Hong Kong public offering will be registered on the Hong Kong share register in order to be listed and traded on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. Holders of Class A ordinary shares registered on the Hong Kong share register will be able to convert these Class A ordinary shares into ADSs, and vice versa. See “Conversion Between Class A Ordinary Shares and ADSs.”
It is unclear whether, as a matter of Hong Kong law, the trading or conversion of ADSs constitutes a sale or purchase of the underlying Hong Kong-registered ordinary shares that is subject to Hong Kong stamp duty. We advise investors to consult their own tax advisors on this matter. See “Risk Factors—Risks Relating to the Global Offering and the Dual Listing—There is uncertainty as to whether Hong Kong stamp duty will apply to the trading or conversion of our ADSs following our initial public offering in Hong Kong and listing of our Class A ordinary shares on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.”
Corporate Information
Our principal executive offices are located at 11 Wenliang Street, Shunyi District, Beijing 101399, People’s Republic of China. Our telephone number at this address is +86 (10) 8742-7209. Our registered office in the Cayman Islands is located at PO Box 309, Ugland House, Grand Cayman KY1-1104, Cayman Islands. Our agent for service of process in the United States is Cogency Global Inc., located at 122 East 42nd Street, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10168.
 
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Investors should submit any inquiries to the address and telephone number of our principal executive offices. Our main website is www.lixiang.com. The information contained on our website is not a part of this prospectus supplement. Information appearing on our website is not incorporated by reference into this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus.
Recent Developments
Issuance of the 2028 Notes
In April 2021, we issued the US$862.5 million in aggregate principal amount of 0.25% convertible senior notes due 2028, or the 2028 Notes, which may be converted, at an initial conversion rate of 35.2818 ADSs per US$1,000 principal amount of notes (which represents an initial conversion price of US$28.34 per ADS) at each holder’s option at any time on or after November 1, 2027, until the close of business on the second scheduled trading day immediately preceding the maturity date of May 1, 2028, or at the option of the holders upon satisfaction of certain conditions and during certain periods prior to the close of business on business day immediately preceding November 1, 2027 based on an initial conversion rate of 35.2818 of our ADSs per US$1,000 principal amount of notes. The conversion rate is subject to adjustment upon occurrence of certain events. The 2028 Notes bear interest at a rate of 0.25% per year, payable semiannually in arrears on May 1 and November 1 of each year, beginning on November 1, 2021. Holders of the 2028 Notes may require us to repurchase all or part of their notes for cash on May 1, 2024 and on May 1, 2026, in each case, at a repurchase price equal to 100% of the principal amount of the notes to be repurchased, plus accrued and unpaid interest to, but excluding, the relevant repurchase date. Assuming full conversion of the 2028 Notes at the initial conversion rate of 35.2818 ADSs per US$1,000 principal amount, the 2028 Notes will be convertible into 30,430,552 ADSs, representing 60,861,104 Class A ordinary shares. For illustrative purposes only, 60,861,104 Class A ordinary shares represent approximately 2.88% of the total issued share capital (as if enlarged by the issue of such shares) of our company immediately upon completion of the Global Offering (assuming the over-allotment option is not exercised and no further shares are issued under our share incentive plans). Other than optional redemption for changes in the tax laws, the 2028 Notes may not be redeemed by us at our option prior to maturity.
After performing sufficient due diligence work that our directors consider appropriate and after due and careful consideration, the directors confirm that, up to the date of this prospectus supplement, there has been no material adverse change in our financial or trading position or prospects since March 31, 2021, being the end date of the periods reported on in the unaudited interim condensed financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement, and there is no event since March 31, 2021 that would materially affect the information as set out in the unaudited interim condensed financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement.
Recent Business Developments
The Li ONEs we sold during 2019, 2020, and the three months ended March 31, 2021 were previous generation of Li ONEs with an NEDC range of 800 kilometers prior to our release of 2021 Li ONE. Subsequent to March 31, 2021, we delivered 5,539, 4,323, 7,713, and 8,589 Li ONEs in April, May, June, and July 2021, respectively. As of July 31, 2021, we delivered 72,340 Li ONEs in total. As Li ONE continues to gain traction rapidly, our new orders surpassed 10,000 in June 2021, hitting a record high. On July 10, 2021, we opened our 100th retail store.
On May 25, 2021, we released the 2021 Li ONE equipped with navigation on ADAS (NOA) as a standard configuration. The 2021 Li ONE features comprehensive upgrades, including an enhanced NEDC range of 1,080 kilometers, optimized mobility comfort, and more intelligent cockpit, bringing premium features to our users at an MSRP of RMB338,000 (approximately US$52,000). We began deliveries of the 2021 Li ONE on June 1, 2021 and we delivered 7,333 2021 Li ONEs in June 2021.
In July 2021, we signed a memorandum of understanding with a local company for collaboration in a reconstruction and expansion project of an automobile manufacturing plant in Shunyi District, Beijing, China.
 
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Recent Regulatory Developments
On July 10, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China published the Measures for Cybersecurity Review (Revised Draft for Comments), which stipulate that if an operator has personal information of over one million users and intends to be listed in a foreign country, it must be subject to the cybersecurity review. As advised by our PRC legal counsel, the draft measures were released for public comment only, and its implementation provisions and anticipated adoption or effective date may be subject to change and thus remain substantially uncertain. We cannot predict the impact of the draft measures, if any, at this stage, and we will closely monitor and assess any development in the rule-making process. See “Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Our Business and Industry—Our business is subject to various evolving PRC laws and regulations regarding data privacy and cybersecurity. Failure of cybersecurity and data privacy concerns could subject us to penalties, damage our reputation and brand, and harm our business and results of operations.”
Under the current PRC cybersecurity laws, critical information infrastructure operators that intend to purchase internet products and services that may affect national security must be subject to the cybersecurity review. As advised by our PRC legal counsel, the exact scope of “critical information infrastructure operators” under the draft measures and the current regulatory regime remains unclear, and the PRC government authorities may have wide discretion in the interpretation and enforcement of these laws. Currently, the Cybersecurity Law has not directly affected our business and operations, but in anticipation of the strengthened implementation of cybersecurity laws and regulations and the expansion of our business, we face potential risks if we are deemed as a critical information infrastructure operator under the Cybersecurity Law. In such case, we must fulfill certain obligations as required under the Cybersecurity Law and other applicable laws, including, among others, storing personal information and important data collected and produced within the PRC territory during our operations in China, which we have fulfilled in our business, and we may be subject to review when purchasing internet products and services. If a final version of the draft measures is adopted, we may be subject to review when conducting data processing activities, and may face challenges in addressing its requirements and make necessary changes to our internal policies and practices in data processing.
As of the date of this prospectus supplement, we have not been involved in any investigations on cybersecurity review made by the Cyberspace Administration of China on such basis, and we have not received any inquiry, notice, warning, or sanctions in such respect. Based on the foregoing, we and our PRC legal counsel do not expect that, as of the date of this prospectus supplement, the current applicable PRC laws on cybersecurity would have a material adverse impact on our business.
On July 6, 2021, the relevant PRC government authorities made public the Opinions on Strictly Cracking Down Illegal Securities Activities in Accordance with the Law. These opinions emphasized the need to strengthen the administration over illegal securities activities and the supervision on overseas listings by China-based companies and proposed to take effective measures, such as promoting the construction of relevant regulatory systems to deal with the risks and incidents faced by China-based overseas-listed companies. As these opinions are recently issued, official guidance and related implementation rules have not been issued yet and the interpretation of these opinions remains unclear at this stage. See “Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Doing Business in China—The approval of the CSRC or other PRC government authorities may be required in connection with this offering under PRC law, and, if required, we cannot predict whether or for how long we will be able to obtain such approval.” As of the date of this prospectus supplement, we have not received any inquiry, notice, warning, or sanctions regarding this offering from the CSRC or any other PRC government authorities. Based on the foregoing and the currently effective PRC laws, we and our PRC legal counsel are of the view that, as of the date of this prospectus supplement, these opinions do not have a material adverse impact on our business, nor any material impact on the disclosure, including PRC counsel’s opinion, taken as a whole, as stated in “Risk Factors—Risk Relation to Our Corporate Structure—If the PRC government deems that our contractual arrangements with our VIEs do not comply with PRC regulatory restrictions on foreign investment in the relevant industries, or if these regulations or the interpretation of existing regulations change in the future, we could be subject to severe penalties or be forced to relinquish our interests in those operations” and “Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Doing Business in China—The approval of the CSRC or other PRC government authorities may be required in connection with our
 
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offshore offerings under PRC law, and, if required, we cannot predict whether or for how long we will be able to obtain such approval.”
Based on the currently available information and independent due diligence work conducted by the Joint Sponsors, including but not limited to, (i) discussing with the management of the company to understand, among others, the cybersecurity and data privacy control of the company and imminent impact on the business of the company caused by the current applicable PRC laws and the recent regulatory developments on cybersecurity; (ii) reviewing representations made by the company in the responses to the due diligence questionnaire and the relevant supporting documents, and (iii) discussing with the PRC legal counsel on, among others, the potential impact and latest status of the aforementioned recent regulatory developments. Based on the foregoing facts and analysis and having considered the relevant due diligence conducted by the Joint Sponsors, nothing has come to the attention of the Joint Sponsors that would cause them to cast doubt on the reasonableness of the company’s and the PRC legal counsel’s views that (i) they do not expect that, as of the date of this prospectus supplement, the current applicable PRC laws on cybersecurity would have a material adverse impact on the business of the company and (ii) as of the date of this prospectus supplement, the Opinions on Strictly Cracking Down Illegal Securities Activities in Accordance with the Law do not have a material adverse impact on the business of the company.
 
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THE GLOBAL OFFERING
Public Offering Price
HK$118.00, or US$15.18, per Class A ordinary share.
The Global Offering
We are offering 100,000,000 Class A ordinary shares in the Global Offering, consisting of an international offering of 90,000,000 Class A ordinary shares offered hereby, and a Hong Kong public offering of 10,000,000 Class A ordinary shares. For more information, see “Underwriting.”
Option to Purchase Additional Class A Ordinary Shares
We have granted the international underwriters an option, exercisable by the joint global coordinators, on behalf of the international underwriters, to purchase up to an additional 15,000,000 Class A ordinary shares at the public offering price until 30 days after the last day for the lodging of applications under the Hong Kong public offering. Goldman Sachs (Asia) L.L.C. has entered into a borrowing arrangement with Inspired Elite Investments Limited to facilitate the settlement of over-allocations.
Ordinary Shares Outstanding Immediately After the Global Offering
2,051,845,710 ordinary shares, consisting of 1,696,033,630 Class A ordinary shares (or 1,711,033,630 Class A ordinary shares if the international underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional Class A ordinary shares in full) and 355,812,080 Class B ordinary shares, excluding 33,366,988 Class A ordinary shares issued to our depositary bank for bulk issuance of ADSs reserved for future issuances upon the exercise or vesting of awards granted under our share incentive plans.
Use of Proceeds
We estimate that we will receive net proceeds from the Global Offering of approximately HK$11.6 billion, or US$1.5 billion (or approximately HK$13.3 billion, or US$1.7 billion, if the joint global coordinators exercise in full, on behalf of the international underwriters, the option to purchase additional Class A ordinary shares), after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. No fees or other remuneration will be paid by the underwriters to us or Inspired Elite Investments Limited for the loan of the ordinary shares discussed above in “Option to Purchase Additional Class A Ordinary Shares.”
In line with our strategies, we intend to use the net proceeds from the Global Offering for the following purposes:

45% of the net proceeds, or approximately HK$5.2 billion, allocated to research and development in the next 12 to 36 months to fund (i) the research and development of HPC BEV technologies, platforms, and future models, (ii) the research and development of intelligent vehicle and autonomous driving technologies, and (iii) the research and development of future EREV models in the next 12 to 30 months;

45% of the net proceeds, or approximately HK$5.2 billion, to fund infrastructure expansion and marketing and
 
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promotion in the next 12 to 36 months to fund (i) the expansion of production capacity, (ii) the expansion of retail stores and delivery and servicing centers, (iii) the roll- out of HPC network, and (iv) marketing and promotion.

10% of the net proceeds, or approximately HK$1.2 billion, for working capital and other general corporate purposes to support our business operation and growth in the next 12 months.
See “Use of Proceeds” for more information.
Lock-up
In connection with the Global Offering, we have agreed, subject to some exceptions, not to sell, transfer, or dispose of, directly or indirectly, any of our ordinary shares, or ADSs representing the Class A ordinary shares, or any securities convertible into or exchangeable or exercisable for our ordinary shares for a period of six months after the Listing Date. See “Shares Eligible for Future Sale” and “Underwriting” for more information.
Risk Factors
You should carefully read “Risk Factors” beginning on page S-27 and the other information included in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus, and other documents incorporated by reference herein and therein, including our 2020 Form 20-F and the Super 6-K, as amended,for a discussion of factors you should carefully consider before deciding to invest in our Class A ordinary shares.
Hong Kong Stock Exchange Code for the Class A Ordinary Shares
2015.
Payment and Settlement
The underwriters expect to deliver the Class A ordinary shares against payment therefor through the facilities of the Central Clearing and Settlement System on or around August 12, 2021.
 
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RISK FACTORS
An investment in our Class A ordinary shares involves significant risks. You should carefully consider the risks described below together with the risks described in our 2020 Form 20-F, Exhibit 99.1 to the Super 6-K, as amended, and the other information contained in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus, including the documents incorporated by reference. Any of these risks could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. In any such case, the market price of our Class A ordinary shares could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment.
Please see “Where You Can Find More Information” and “Incorporation of Certain Documents by Reference” for information on where you can find the documents we have filed with or furnished to the SEC and which are incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement.
Risks Relating to Our Business and Industry
We have a limited operating history and face significant challenges as a new entrant into our industry.
We were founded in 2015, started volume production of our first vehicle model, Li ONE, in November 2019, and delivered over 72,000 Li ONEs as of July 31, 2021. There is no historical basis for making judgments on the demand for our vehicles or our ability to develop, manufacture, and deliver vehicles, or our profitability in the future. It is difficult to predict our future revenues and appropriately budget for our expenses, and we may have limited insight into trends that may emerge and affect our business. You should consider our business and prospects in light of the risks and challenges we face as a new entrant into our industry, including with respect to our ability to continuously advance our EV technologies, such as EREV and HPC BEV technologies, to develop and manufacture safe, reliable, and quality vehicles that appeal to users; delivery and servicing of a large volume of vehicles; turn profitable; build a well-recognized and respected brand cost-effectively; expand our vehicle lineup; navigate the evolving regulatory environment; improve and maintain our operational efficiency; manage supply chain effectively; and adapt to changing market conditions, including technological developments and changes in competitive landscape; and manage our growth effectively.
While we currently focus on SUVs equipped with range extension systems, we will introduce new models in other categories or using other technologies that we have less experience in, such as BEV models or BEV technologies, as we may adjust our strategies and plans from time to time to remain competitive as a new entrant into our industry. If we fail to address any or all of these risks and challenges, our business may be materially and adversely affected.
Our ability to develop, manufacture, and deliver automobiles of high quality and appeal to users, on schedule, and on a large scale is unproven and still evolving.
The sustainability of our business depends, in large part, on our ability to timely execute our plan to develop, manufacture, and deliver on a large scale automobiles of high quality and appeal to users. The current annual production capacity of our own Changzhou manufacturing facility is 100,000 units with a utilization rate of approximately 36% in 2020, which we plan to fully utilize and increase to 200,000 vehicles in 2022. Our Changzhou manufacturing facility will continue to produce Li ONE and, with additional investment in necessary tooling and fixture upgrades, our planned full-size premium smart extended-range electric SUV. To date we have limited automobile manufacturing experience to balance production volume and vehicle quality and appeal, and therefore cannot assure you that we will be able to achieve our targeted production volume of commercially viable vehicles on a timely basis, or at all.
Our continued development, manufacturing, and delivery of automobiles of high quality to achieve our targeted production volume are and will be subject to risks, including with respect to:

lack of necessary funding;

delays or disruptions in our supply chain;
 
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delays in the research and development of technologies necessary for our vehicles;

quality control deficiencies;

compliance with environmental, workplace safety, and relevant regulations; and

cost overruns.
Historically, automakers are expected to periodically introduce new and improved models to stay abreast of the market. To remain competitive, we may be required to introduce new vehicle models and perform facelifts on existing vehicle models earlier or more frequently than is originally planned. We cannot assure you that facelifts on Li ONE or any future models we launch will appeal to the users as we expect or that any introduction of new models or facelifts will not affect the sales of existing models.
Furthermore, we rely on third-party suppliers for the provision and development of many of the key components and materials used in our vehicles. To the extent our suppliers experience any difficulties in providing us with or developing necessary components, we could experience delays in delivering vehicles. Any delay in the development, manufacturing, and delivery of Li ONE or future models, or in performing facelifts to existing models, could subject us to user complaints and materially and adversely affect our reputation, demand for our vehicles, and our growth prospects.
Any of the foregoing could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
We currently depend on revenues generated from a single model of vehicles and in the foreseeable future from a limited number of models.
Our business currently depends substantially on the sales and success of Li ONE, which is our only production model in the market until the introduction of our planned full-size premium smart extended-range electric SUV in 2022, and two more extended-range electric SUV models. Starting from 2023, we plan to launch at least two new HPC BEV models each year. To the extent our product variety and cycles do not meet consumer expectations, or cannot be achieved on our projected timelines and cost and volume targets, our future sales may be adversely affected. Given that for the foreseeable future our business will depend on a limited number of vehicle models, to the extent a particular model, such as our planned HPC BEV model, is not timely launched or well-received by the market, our sales volume could be materially and adversely affected, which in turn could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Our vehicles are designed and manufactured for Chinese families, and this is likely the case in the foreseeable future. If the demand for our vehicles significantly decreases, due to a significant change in the average spending power of Chinese families, significant decrease in the number of Chinese families, mismatched market positioning, or other reasons, our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects could be materially and adversely affected.
In addition, our single standard configuration with a flat price for Li ONE may not be as effective as we intend. We provide premium and technology features that are typically offered as costly add-ons by our competitors as standard in Li ONE, to save users’ time and money while alleviating our burden in production, sales, and support. However, we cannot assure you that such endeavors will succeed. Users may prefer personalized features based on diversified tastes and needs. In addition, our flat pricing could still exceed certain users’ budget significantly. To the extent that we are unable to meet various user needs in promoting our single standard configuration with flat pricing for Li ONE, our business may be materially and adversely affected.
We are subject to risks associated with EREVs.
EREVs accounted for only 2.8% of the NEV market in terms of sales volume in 2020, according to the CIC Report. EREV technologies are advanced technologies with limited instances of successful commercialization. There is no assurance that EREVs will be continue to be accepted by the market. Moreover, our business and future results of operations will depend on our ability to continue to develop
 
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our EREV technologies and improve the performance and efficiency in a cost-effective and timely manner. Our research and development efforts may not be sufficient to adapt to changes in the EREV technologies as well as developments in other EV technologies, including BEV technology, which may reduce the competitive advantages of EREV technology. As technologies evolve, we plan to upgrade or adapt our vehicles and introduce new models with the latest technologies, including EREV technologies. This will require us to invest resources in research and development and to cooperate effectively on new designs with our suppliers, develop actionable insights from data analysis and user feedback, and respond effectively to technological changes and policy and regulatory developments.
As a pioneer to successfully commercialize EREVs in China, we have limited experience to date in volume production of EREVs. We cannot assure you that we will be able to maintain efficient and automated manufacturing capabilities and processes, or reliable sources of component supply that will enable us to meet the quality, price, design, engineering, and production standards, as well as the production volumes to satisfy the market demand for Li ONE and future models.
We also believe that user confidence in EREVs is essential in promoting our vehicles. As a result, consumers will be less likely to purchase our EREVs if they are not convinced of the technical and functional superiority of EREVs. Any defects in or significant malfunctioning of the range extension system, or any negative perceptions of EREVs with or without any grounds, may weaken consumer confidence in EREVs, cause safety concerns among consumers and negatively impact our brand name, financial condition, and results of operations. Similarly, suppliers and other third parties will be less likely to invest time and resources in developing business relationships with us if they are not convinced that our business will succeed.
We recorded net losses and had negative net cash flows from operations in the past, and we have not been profitable, which may continue in the future.
We have not been profitable since our inception. We incurred net loss of RMB1.5 billion, RMB2.4 billion, RMB151.7 million (US$23.1 million), and RMB360.0 million (US$54.9 million) in 2018, 2019, and 2020 and for the three months ended March 31, 2021, respectively. We expect to continue to incur widening net loss in 2021 primarily due to our continuing investments in (i) the research and development of our future models and autonomous driving solutions, and (ii) the expansion of our production facilities and sales and servicing network. In addition, we had negative net cash flows from operating activities of RMB1.3 billion and RMB1.8 billion in 2018 and 2019, respectively. In 2020 and for the three months ended March 31, 2021, we had positive net cash flows from operating activities of RMB3.1 billion (US$479.2 million) and RMB926.3 million (US$141.4 million), respectively. We made capital expenditures of RMB970.7 million, RMB952.9 million, RMB675.2 million (US$103.1 million), and RMB356.1 million (US$54.4 million) in 2018, 2019, and 2020 and for the three months ended March 31, 2021, respectively. The pressure on us to generate or maintain positive cash flow may be further exacerbated by our contractual obligations, including capital commitments, operating lease obligations, purchase obligations, finance leases and borrowings. We expect to continue to invest in the production ramp-up of Li ONE, expansion of the Changzhou manufacturing facility, expansion of retail stores, galleries, and delivery and servicing centers, and research and development to further expand our business. These investments may not result in revenue increase, or at all, and we may have negative net cash flows from operations again in the future.
We may not generate sufficient revenues or continue to incur substantial losses for a number of reasons, including lack of demand for our vehicles, increasing competition, and other risks discussed herein, and we may incur unforeseen expenses, or encounter difficulties, complications, or delays in deriving revenues or achieving profitability.
Our research and development efforts may not yield the results as expected.
As an emerging automaker, we heavily rely on research and development to establish and strengthen our market position. We develop electric vehicle technologies, such as next-generation EREV powertrain system, high C-rate battery, high-voltage platform, ultra-fast charging technologies, autonomous driving technologies, next-generation intelligent cockpit, operating systems, and computing platforms. In 2018, 2019, and 2020 and for the three months ended March 31, 2021, our research and
 
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development expenses amounted to RMB793.7 million, RMB1.2 billion, RMB1.1 billion (US$167.9 million), and RMB514.5 million (US$78.5 million), respectively. Our research and development expenses accounted for 11.6% and 14.4% of our total revenues in 2020 and for the three months ended March 31, 2021, respectively. As technologies evolve, we plan to upgrade or adopt our vehicles and introduce new models with latest technologies, which will require us to invest resources in research and development. Therefore, we expect that our research and development expenses will continue to be significant. As research and development activities are inherently uncertain, we cannot assure you that we will continue to achieve desirable developments from our research and development activities and successfully commercialize such developments. Consequently, our significant research and development efforts may not yield the results as expected. If our research and development efforts fail to keep up with the latest technological developments, we could suffer a decline in our competitive position, which may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
We could experience disruptions in supply of raw materials or components used in our vehicles from our suppliers, some of which are our single-source suppliers for the components they supply.
Li ONE uses over 1,900 parts, including battery cells and semiconductor chips, that we source from over 190 suppliers, some of which are currently our single-source suppliers selected from two or more suppliers that are readily available in the market for these components, and we expect that this may continue for our future vehicles that we may produce. We also rely on key raw materials, such as steel and aluminum, sourced from our suppliers. The supply chain exposes us to multiple potential sources of delivery failure or component shortages. Although we reserve the flexibility to obtain components from multiple sources whenever possible, similar to other players in our industry, many of the components used in our vehicles are purchased by us from a single source. Following the disruptions to semiconductor manufacturers due to the COVID-19 pandemic and an increase in global demand for personal computers for work-from-home economies, there is an ongoing global chip shortage, which would materially and adversely affect the automotive industry. The supply chain exposes us to multiple potential sources of delivery failure or component shortages.
We do not control our suppliers or their business practices. Accordingly, we cannot guarantee that the quality of the components manufactured by them will be consistent and maintained to a high standard. Any defects of or quality issues with these components or any noncompliance incidents associated with these third-party suppliers could result in quality issues with our vehicles and hence compromise our brand image and results of operations. Additionally, we cannot guarantee the suppliers’ compliance with ethical business practices, such as environmental responsibilities, fair wage practices, and compliance with child labor laws, among others. A lack of demonstrated compliance could lead us to seek alternative suppliers, which could increase our costs and results in delayed delivery of our products, product shortages, or other disruptions of our operations.
Furthermore, qualifying alternate suppliers or developing our own replacements for certain highly customized components of Li ONE may be time consuming and costly. Any disruption in the supply of components, whether or not from a single-source supplier, could temporarily disrupt production of our vehicles until an alternative supplier is fully qualified by us or is otherwise able to supply us the required material. We cannot assure you that we would be able to successfully retain alternative suppliers or supplies on a timely basis, on acceptable terms, or at all. Changes in business conditions, force majeure, government changes, or other factors beyond our control or anticipation, could also affect our suppliers’ ability to deliver components to us on a timely basis. Moreover, if we experience a significant increase in demand or need to replace our existing suppliers, there can be no assurance that additional supplies will be available when required on terms that are favorable to us, or at all, or that any supplier would allocate sufficient supplies to us in order to meet our requirements or fill our orders in a timely manner. Any of the foregoing could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects.
 
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Orders for Li ONE may be canceled by users despite their deposit payment and online confirmation.
Our users may cancel their orders for many reasons outside of our control, and we have experienced cancelation of orders in the past. In addition, users may terminate their orders even after they have paid deposits and waited for 24 hours upon which their orders automatically become confirmed orders and the deposits become non-fundable. The potentially long wait from reservation to delivery could also impact user decisions on whether to ultimately make a purchase, due to potential changes in preferences, competitive developments, and other factors. If we encounter delays in the deliveries of Li ONE or future vehicle models, a significant number of orders may be canceled. As a result, we cannot assure you that orders will not be canceled and will ultimately result in the final purchase, delivery, and sale of the vehicles. Such cancelations could harm our business, brand image, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects.
Changes in PRC government policies that are favorable for NEVs or domestically manufactured vehicles could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects.
The growth of our business benefits from PRC government policies at central and local levels that support the development of NEVs and domestically manufactured vehicles. There are uncertainties about governments’ support for HPC network, which is essential to our plan to launch HPC BEVs.
The PRC government has been implementing strict vehicle emission standards for ICE vehicles. On December 28, 2018, the PRC State Administration for Market Regulation, or the SAMR and the PRC National Standardization Administration jointly issued the Electric Vehicle Energy Consumption Standards, effective on July 1, 2019, to regulate electric vehicles regarding their energy efficiency. As an EREV, Li ONE is equipped with both an ICE-based range extension system and electric motors, and is thus required to comply with both standards. If the electric vehicle energy consumption standards and vehicle emission standards become significantly stricter, we may incur significant costs to obtain advanced energy technology to upgrade our vehicles or design new vehicles if we are able to at all, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects.
In addition, changes in classification of NEVs and license plate policies have affected, and may continue to affect our business. In certain cities in China, municipal governments impose quotas and lottery or bidding systems to limit the number of license plates issued to ICE vehicles, but exempt NEVs from these restrictions to incentivize the development of the NEV market. Nevertheless, in January 2018, the Beijing municipal government announced that it would only allow BEVs to be considered the NEVs exempt from the license plate restrictions, and EREVs would be treated as ICE vehicles in Beijing for the purposes of obtaining license plates. On December 10, 2018, the NDRC, promulgated the Provisions on Administration of Investment in Automotive Industry, effective on January 10, 2019, which categorize EREVs as electric vehicles, although its impact on the Beijing municipal government’s license plate policy remained uncertain. Similarly, in February 2021, the local counterpart of the NDRC and other four governmental authorities in Shanghai announced similar arrangements that only BEVs would be considered the NEVs exempt from the license plate restrictions starting from January 1, 2023. As a result, Li ONEs sold in Beijing and Shanghai may not enjoy the exemptions from the license plate restrictions available to the BEVs. Two of the major markets for Li ONEs are Beijing and Shanghai, whose respective cumulative sales volume accounts for 6.3% and 9.4% of our total cumulative sales volume as of April 30, 2021, according to the CIC Report. It is uncertain whether the arrangements regarding license plate restrictions will reduce the demand for EREVs, and Li ONEs in particular, in Beijing and Shanghai. Although we are currently not aware of any government plan to adopt similar measures in areas other than Beijing and Shanghai, changes in government policies on the classification of NEVs and license plates, at a local or central level, may materially and adversely affect the demand for Li ONE and our future vehicles, which in turn could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial conditions, and prospects.
Furthermore, changes in government incentives or subsidies to support NEVs could adversely affect our business. EREVs enjoy certain favorable government incentives and subsidies, including
 
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exemption from vehicle purchase tax, one-time government subsidies, exemption from license plate restrictions in certain cities, exemption from driving restrictions in certain cities, and preferential utility rates for charging facilities. However, China’s central government has begun implementing a phase-out schedule for the subsidies provided for purchasers of certain NEVs, which provided that the amount of subsidies provided for purchasers of certain NEVs in 2019 and 2020 would be reduced by 48% as compared to 2017 levels. In April 2020, the PRC Ministry of Finance and other national regulatory authorities issued a circular to extend the original end date of subsidies for NEV purchasers to the end of 2022 and reduce the amount of subsidies in 10% increments each year commencing from 2020. However, only NEVs with an MSRP of RMB300,000 or less before subsidies are eligible for such subsidies starting from July 2020, and the MSRP of Li ONE is higher than the threshold. Li ONE used to be eligible for a government subsidy of RMB10,000 per individual buyer before April 2020, which already had been effectively reflected in the then MSRP of RMB328,000 (approximately US$50,000). Such government subsidy was reduced to RMB8,500 per individual buyer from April to July 2020. After July 2020, Li ONE is no longer eligible for such government subsidy. The MSRP of the Li ONE had remained to be RMB328,000 (approximately US$50,000), regardless of whether Li ONE is eligible for the government subsidy, until the release of the 2021 Li ONE on May 25, 2021. Therefore, the phase- out and cease of the government subsidies have resulted in a decrease of our revenues per vehicle.
Moreover, there is no guarantee that we will be able to successfully commercialize or otherwise offer vehicles that meet this subsidy threshold. We cannot assure you that any further changes would be favorable to our business. Furthermore, any reduction, elimination or discriminatory application of government subsidies and economic incentives because of policy changes, the reduced need for such subsidies and incentives due to the perceived success of NEVs, fiscal tightening or other factors may affect government incentives or subsides and result in the diminished competitiveness of the NEV industry generally.
Our vehicles sales are also impacted by government policies including tariffs on imported cars. According to an announcement by the PRC government, the tariff on imported passenger vehicles (other than those originating in the United States of America) was reduced to 15% starting from July 1, 2018. As a result, pricing advantage of domestically manufactured vehicles could be diminished. Pursuant to the Special Administrative Measures for Market Access of Foreign Investment (2020), or the 2020 Negative List, which is jointly promulgated by the NDRC and the Ministry of Commerce and became effective on July 23, 2020, there is no limit on foreign ownership of automakers for NEVs. In addition, the limits on foreign ownership of automakers for ICE passenger vehicles would be lifted by 2022. As a result, foreign NEV competitors and in the future foreign ICE automakers could build wholly-owned facilities in China without the need for a domestic joint venture partner. For example, Tesla has completed its construction of a factory in Shanghai without a joint venture partner and has begun operations. These changes could intensify market competition and reduce our pricing advantage, which in turn could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial conditions, and prospects.
The global shortage in the supply of semiconductor chips may disrupt our operations and adversely affect our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
Since October 2020, the supply of semiconductor chips used for automotive manufacturing has been subject to a global shortage following the disruption to semiconductor manufacturers due to the COVID-19 pandemic and an increase in global demand for personal computers for work-from-home economies. Although as of the date of this prospectus supplement, we had not experienced any disruption in the manufacture of our vehicles due to a shortage in the supply of chips, we cannot assure you that we will be able to continue to obtain sufficient amount of chips or other semiconductor components at a reasonable cost. In addition, similar to other components, many of the semiconductor components used in our vehicles are purchased by us from a single source although we reserve the flexibility to obtain the components from multiple sources. If the suppliers for the semiconductor components become unable to meet our demand on acceptable terms, or at all, we may be required to switch to other suppliers, which could be time consuming and costly. If we fail to find alternative suppliers in time, or at all, our production and deliveries could be materially disrupted, which may materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
 
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The global shortage in the supply of battery packs may disrupt our operations and adversely affect our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
Our vehicles currently make use of lithium-ion battery cells, which we purchase from third-party suppliers. The prices for the battery cells fluctuate, and their available supply may be unstable, depending on market conditions and global demand for the battery cells and the materials used in the battery cells, such as lithium, nickel, cobalt, and manganese. There is a looming shortage of battery packs since mid-2020 as a result of an increase in global demand due to increased production of NEVs, rising demand for raw material of battery cells, and the disruption in the supply chain due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Although as of the date of this prospectus supplement, we had not experienced any disruption in the manufacture of our vehicles due to a shortage in the supply of battery packs, we cannot assure you that we will be able to continue to obtain sufficient amount of battery packs at a reasonable cost. Our business is dependent on the continued supply of battery packs used in our vehicles. We purchase battery pack from CATL, with which we have developed close partnership for battery packs. If CATL becomes unable to meet our demand on acceptable terms, or at all, we may be required to switch to alternative suppliers. Any disruption in the supply of battery packs from CATL could disrupt production of our vehicles until such time as we find an alternative supplier. There can be no assurance that we would be able to successfully retain alternative suppliers on a timely basis, on acceptable terms or at all. If we fail to find alternative suppliers in time, our production and deliveries could be materially disrupted, which may materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
If we fail to effectively manage our inventory, our financial condition, results of operations, and prospects may be materially and adversely affected.
We are exposed to inventory risks that may adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, and prospects as a result of increased competition, seasonality, new model launches, rapid changes in vehicle life cycles and pricing, defective vehicles, changes in consumer demand and consumer spending patterns, and other factors. In order to operate our business effectively and meet our users’ demands and expectations, we must maintain a certain level of inventory to avoid overstocking or understocking issues and ensure timely delivery. We determine our level of inventory based on our experience and assessment of user demands and number of orders from users.
However, forecasts are inherently uncertain, and the demand for our vehicles may change between the order date and the projected delivery date. If we fail to accurately forecast the demand, we may experience inventory obsolescence and inventory shortage risk. Inventory levels in excess of demand may result in inventory write-downs or write-offs and the sale of excess inventory at discounted prices, which could adversely affect our profitability. We did not recognize inventory write-downs in 2018, 2019, and 2020 and for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2021. In addition, if we underestimate the demand for our vehicles, we may not be able to manufacture a sufficient number of vehicles to meet such unanticipated demand, which could result in delays in the delivery of our vehicles and harm our reputation.
Any of the above may materially and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. As we plan to continue to expand our vehicle offerings, we may continue to face challenges in effectively managing our inventory.
We may be compelled to undertake product recalls or other actions, which could adversely affect our brand image, financial condition, results of operations, and growth prospects.
We may be subject to adverse publicity, damage to our brand, and costs for recalls of our vehicles. Effective on November 7, 2020, we voluntarily recalled 10,469 Li ONEs produced on or before June 1, 2020 to replace, free of charge, the control arm ball joint of the front suspension on these Li ONEs in accordance with the requirements by the SAMR. Li ONEs produced after June 1, 2020 are already equipped with an upgraded version of the control arm ball joint of the front suspension. As of the date of this prospectus supplement, we completed over 98.5% of all the replacements and are not aware of any material accidents due to any defects in the control arm ball joint of the front suspension being replaced.
 
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In the future, we may at various times, voluntarily or involuntarily, initiate a recall if any of our vehicles, including any systems or parts sourced from our suppliers, prove to be defective or noncompliant with applicable laws and regulations. Such recalls, whether voluntary or involuntary, could involve significant expense and could adversely affect our brand image in our target markets, as well as our business, financial condition, results of operations, and growth prospects.
Our business plans require a significant amount of capital. In addition, our future capital needs may require us to issue additional equity or debt securities that may dilute our shareholders or introduce covenants that may restrict our operations or our ability to pay dividends.
We will need significant capital to, among other things, conduct research and development, expand our production capacity, and roll out our retail stores, galleries, and delivery and servicing centers. As we ramp up our production capacity and operations we may also require significant capital to maintain our property, plant, and equipment and such costs may be greater than what we currently anticipate. We expect that our level of capital expenditures will be significantly affected by consumer demand for our products and services. The fact that we have a limited operating history means we have limited historical data on the demand for our products and services. As a result, our future capital requirements may be uncertain and actual capital requirements may be different from what we currently anticipate. We may seek equity or debt financing to finance a portion of our capital expenditures. Such financing might not be available to us in a timely manner or on terms that are acceptable, or at all. If we cannot obtain sufficient capital on acceptable terms, our business, financial condition, and prospects may be materially and adversely affected.
Our ability to obtain the necessary financing to carry out our business plan is subject to a number of factors, including general market conditions and investor acceptance of our business plan. These factors may make the timing, amount, terms and conditions of such financing unattractive or unavailable to us. If we are unable to raise sufficient funds, we will have to significantly reduce our spending, delay or cancel our planned activities, or substantially change our corporate structure. As of December 31, 2018 and 2019, we had shareholders’ deficit of RMB2.4 billion and RMB5.7 billion, respectively. As of December 31, 2020 and March 31, 2021, we had shareholders’ equity of RMB29.8 billion (US$4.5 billion) and RMB29.7 billion (US$4.5 billion), respectively. We may have shareholders’ deficit balance in the future, which may limit our ability to obtain financing and materially and adversely affect our liquidity and financial condition. We might not be able to obtain any funding or service any of the debts we incurred, and we might not have sufficient resources to conduct our business as projected, both of which could mean that we would be forced to curtail or discontinue our operations.
In addition, our future capital needs and other business reasons could require us to issue additional equity or debt securities or obtain a credit facility. The issuance of additional equity or equity-linked securities could dilute our shareholders and our memorandum and articles of association do not contain any anti-dilution provision. The incurrence of indebtedness would result in an increase in debt service obligations and could result in operating and financing covenants that would restrict our operations or our ability to pay dividends to our shareholders.
Our business is subject to various evolving PRC laws and regulations regarding data privacy and cybersecurity. Failure of cybersecurity and data privacy concerns could subject us to penalties, damage our reputation and brand, and harm our business and results of operations.
We face significant challenges with respect to cybersecurity and data privacy, including the storage, transmission, and sharing of confidential information. We transmit and store confidential and private information of our users, such as personal information, including names, user accounts, passwords, and payment or transaction-related information.
We are subject to various regulatory requirements relating to cybersecurity and data privacy, including, without limitation the PRC Cybersecurity Law. See “Regulations—Regulations on Internet Information Security and Privacy Protection” in Exhibit 99.1 to the Super 6-K, as amended. We are required by these laws and regulations to ensure the confidentiality, integrity, availability, and authenticity of the information of our users and distributors, which is also essential to maintaining their confidence in our vehicles and services. We have adopted strict information security policies and deployed advanced
 
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measures to implement the policies, including, among others, advanced encryption technologies. However, advances in technology, an increased level of sophistication and diversity of our products and services, an increased level of expertise of hackers, new discoveries in the field of cryptography or others can still result in a compromise or breach of our websites, the Li Auto App, or our vehicles’ electronic systems. If we are unable to protect our systems, and hence the information stored in our systems, from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification, or destruction, such problems or security breaches could cause a loss, give rise to our liabilities to the owners of confidential information, or subject us to fines and other penalties. In addition, complying with various laws and regulations could cause us to incur substantial costs or require us to change our business practices, including our data practices, in a manner adverse to our business.
In addition, regulatory requirements on cybersecurity and data privacy are constantly evolving and can be subject to varying interpretations or significant changes, resulting in uncertainties about the scope of our responsibilities in that regard. For example, the Cyberspace Administration of China issued the Several Provisions on Automobile Data Security Management (Draft for Comments) on May 12, 2021, which further elaborates the principles and requirements for the protection of personal information and important data in the automotive industry, and defines any enterprise or institution engaging in the automobile design, manufacture, and service as a relevant operator. Such operator is required to process personal information or important data in accordance with applicable laws during the automobile design, manufacture, sales, operation, maintenance, and management. On June 10, 2021, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress promulgated the PRC Data Security Law, which will take effect in September 2021. The Data Security Law provides for a security review procedure for the data activities that may affect national security. Furthermore, Measures for Cybersecurity Review, which became effective on June 1, 2020, set forth the cybersecurity review mechanism for critical information infrastructure operators, and provided that critical information infrastructure operators who intend to purchase internet products and services that affect or may affect national security shall be subject to a cybersecurity review. On July 10, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China published the Measures for Cybersecurity Review (Revised Draft for Comments), which further restates and expands the applicable scope of the cybersecurity review. Pursuant to the draft measures, critical information infrastructure operators that intend to purchase internet products and services and data processing operators engaging in data processing activities that affect or may affect national security must be subject to the cybersecurity review. The draft measures further stipulate that if an operator has personal information of over one million users and intends to be listed in a foreign country, it must be subject to the cybersecurity review. See “Regulations—Regulations on Internet Information Security and Privacy Protection” in Exhibit 99.1 to the Super 6-K, as amended. As advised by our PRC legal counsel, the draft measures were released for public comment only, and its operative provisions and the anticipated adoption or effective date may be subject to change with substantial uncertainty. The draft measures remain unclear on whether the relevant requirements will be applicable to companies that intend to be listed in Hong Kong or companies that have been listed in the United States and intend to be listed in Hong Kong, such as us. Furthermore, the exact scope of “critical information infrastructure operators” under the draft measures and the current regulatory regime remains unclear, and the PRC government authorities may have wide discretion in the interpretation and enforcement of these laws. Therefore, it is uncertain whether we would be deemed as a critical information infrastructure operator under PRC law. It also remains uncertain whether the future regulatory changes would impose additional restrictions on companies like us. We cannot predict the impact of the draft measures, if any, at this stage, and we will closely monitor and assess any development in the rule-making process. If the enacted version of the draft measures mandates clearance of cybersecurity review and other specific actions to be completed by companies like us, we face uncertainties as to whether such clearance can be timely obtained, or at all. If we are not able to comply with the cybersecurity and data privacy requirements in a timely manner, or at all, we may be subject to government enforcement actions and investigations, fines, penalties, suspension of our non-compliant operations, or removal of our app from the relevant application stores, among other sanctions, which could materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations.
Our warranty reserves may be insufficient to cover future warranty claims, which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
We provide a five-year or 100,000-kilometer limited warranty for new vehicles, and an eight-year or 120,000-kilometer limited warranty for battery packs, electric motors, and electric motor controllers.
 
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Currently, we also offer each initial owner extended lifetime warranty, subject to certain conditions. Our warranty program is similar to other automakers’ warranty programs and is intended to cover all parts and labor to repair defects in material or workmanship in the body, chassis, suspension, interior, electric systems, battery, powertrain, and brake system. It also covers free road assistance under the warranty coverage. We plan to record and adjust warranty reserves based on changes in estimated costs and actual warranty costs. However, because we only started the volume production of Li ONE in November 2019, our experience with warranty claims regarding our vehicles or with estimating warranty reserves is limited. We cannot assure you that our warranty reserves will be sufficient to cover future warranty claims. We could, in the future, become subject to a significant and unexpected warranty claims, resulting in significant expenses, which would in turn materially and adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, and prospects.
We have granted, and may continue to grant options and other types of awards under our share incentive plan, which may result in increased share-based compensation expenses.
We adopted a share incentive plan in July 2019, or the 2019 Plan, for the purpose of granting share- based compensation awards to employees, directors, and consultants to incentivize their performance and align their interests with ours. We further adopted the 2020 Share Incentive Plan, or the 2020 Plan, in July 2020 and the 2021 Share Incentive Plan, or the 2021 Plan, in March 2021, in each case for the same purpose. Under the 2019 Plan, 2020 Plan, and 2021 Plan, we are authorized to grant options and other types of awards. The maximum number of Class A ordinary shares that may be issued pursuant to all awards under the 2019 Plan is 141,083,452. The maximum number of Class A ordinary shares that may be issued pursuant to all awards under the 2020 Plan is 165,696,625. The maximum number of Class B ordinary shares that may be issued pursuant to all awards under the 2021 Plan is 108,557,400, all of which had been granted as CEO Award Shares and will be converted to Class A ordinary shares on a one-to-one basis with effect immediately upon the Listing. See “Item 6. Directors, Senior Management and Employees—B. Compensation—Share Incentive Plans” in our 2020 Form 20-F, which is incorporated in this prospectus supplement by reference. As of the date of this prospectus supplement, awards to purchase an aggregate amount of 55,393,578 Class A ordinary shares under the 2019 Plan and awards to purchase an aggregate amount of 35,792,086 Class A ordinary shares under the 2020 Plan had been granted and were outstanding, excluding awards that were forfeited or canceled after the relevant grant dates. On March 8, 2021, we granted options to purchase 108,557,400 Class B ordinary shares under our 2021 Share Incentive Plan to Mr. Xiang Li, our chairman and chief executive officer, with certain performance-based vesting conditions. On May 5, 2021, our board approved to replace such options with the same amount of Class B ordinary shares under the same plan, all of which have become vested upon grant on May 5, 2021, subject to certain undertakings of restrictions by Mr. Li based on certain performance conditions substantially similar to the vesting conditions of the options being replaced. These Class B ordinary shares will be converted to Class A ordinary shares on a one-to-one basis with effect immediately upon the Listing.
We believe the granting of share-based awards is of significant importance to our ability to attract and retain key personnel and employees, and we will continue to grant share-based compensation to employees in the future. As a result, our expenses associated with share-based compensation may increase, which may have an adverse effect on our results of operations.
Furthermore, perspective candidates and existing employees often consider the value of the equity awards they receive in connection with their employment. Thus, our ability to attract or retain highly skilled employees may be adversely affected by declines in the perceived value of our equity or equity awards. Furthermore, there are no assurances that the number of shares reserved for issuance under our share incentive plans will be sufficient to grant equity awards adequate to recruit new employees and to compensate existing employees.
As our patents may expire and may not be extended, our patent applications may not be granted, and our patent rights may be contested, circumvented, invalidated, or limited in scope, our patent rights may not protect us effectively. In particular, we may not be able to prevent others from developing or exploiting competing technologies, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
As of March 31, 2021, we had 893 issued patents and 749 pending patent applications in China. We cannot assure you that all our pending patent applications will result in issued patents. Even if our
 
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patent applications succeed and we are issued patents accordingly, it is still uncertain whether these patents will be contested, circumvented, or invalidated in the future. In addition, the rights granted under any issued patents may not provide us with meaningful protection or competitive advantages. The claims under any patents may not be broad enough to prevent others from developing technologies that are similar or that achieve results similar to ours. It is also possible that the intellectual property rights of others could bar us from licensing and exploiting our patents. Numerous patents and pending patent applications owned by others exist in the fields where we have developed and are developing our technology. These patents and patent applications might have priority over our patent applications and could subject our patent applications to invalidation. Finally, in addition to those who may claim priority, any of our existing patents or pending patent applications may also be challenged by others on the basis that they are otherwise invalid or unenforceable.
We might not be able to fulfil our obligation in respect of deferred revenue, which might have impact on our cash or liquidity position.
Our recognition of deferred revenue is subject to future performance obligations. Our deferred revenue mainly includes the transaction price allocated to the performance obligations that are unsatisfied, or partially satisfied, which mainly arises from the undelivered vehicles, charging stalls, vehicle internet connection services, FOTA upgrades, and extended lifetime warranties for initial owners, as well as customer loyalty points offered in connection with the purchase of Li ONE. We may have multiple performance obligations identified in one vehicle sales contract and the purchase price for sales of our vehicles and all embedded products and services to a user for which we have received consideration, or an amount of consideration is due, from the user, is recorded as deferred revenue. Due to potential future changes in user preferences and the need for us to satisfactorily perform product support and other services, deferred revenue at any particular date may not be representative of actual revenue for any current or future period. Any failure to fulfil the obligations in respect of deferred revenue may have an adverse impact on our results of operations and liquidity.
Fluctuation of fair value change of short-term and long-term investments that we made may adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, and prospects.
During 2018, 2019, 2020, and the three months ended March 31, 2021, our short-term investments primarily consisted of investments in financial instruments with variable interest rates and maturity dates within one year, and our long-term investments primarily consisted of investments in publicly traded companies and privately-held companies. The methodologies that we use to assess the fair value of the short-term and long-term investments involve a significant degree of management judgment and are inherently uncertain. In addition, we are exposed to credit risks in relation to our short-term and long-term investments, which may adversely affect the net changes in their fair value. We cannot assure you that market conditions will create fair value gains on our short-term and long-term investments or we will not incur any fair value losses on our short-term and long-term investments in the future. If we incur such fair value losses, our financial condition, results of operations, and prospects may be adversely affected.
We are or may be subject to risks associated with strategic alliances or acquisitions.
We have entered into and may in the future enter into strategic alliances, including joint ventures or minority equity investments, with various third parties to further our business purpose from time to time. These alliances could subject us to a number of risks, including risks associated with sharing proprietary information, non-performance by third parties, and increases in expenses in establishing new strategic alliances, any of which may materially and adversely affect our business. We may have limited ability to monitor or control the actions of these third parties and, to the extent any of these third parties suffers negative publicity or harm to their reputation from events relating to their businesses, we may also suffer negative publicity or harm to our reputation by virtue of our association with any such third party.
In addition, if appropriate opportunities arise, we may acquire additional assets, products, technologies, or businesses that are complementary to our existing business. In addition to possible shareholder approval, we may have to obtain approvals and licenses from relevant government authorities
 
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for the acquisitions and to comply with any applicable PRC laws and regulations, which could result in increasing delay and costs, and may derail our business strategy if we fail to do so. Moreover, the costs of identifying and consummating acquisitions may be significant. Furthermore, past and future acquisitions and the subsequent integration of new assets and businesses into our own require significant attention from our management and could result in a diversion of resources from our existing business, which in turn could have an adverse effect on our operations. Acquired assets or businesses may not generate the financial results we expect. Acquisitions could result in the use of substantial amount of cash, potentially dilutive issuances of equity securities, the occurrence of significant goodwill impairment charges, amortization expenses for other intangible assets, and exposure to potential unknown liabilities of the acquired business. As of December 31, 2018, 2019, and 2020 and March 31, 2021, we had net intangible assets of RMB671.4 million, RMB673.9 million, RMB683.3 million (US$104.3 million), and RMB684.6 million (US$104.5 million), respectively, which primarily consist of the automotive manufacturing permission, software, and patents. We test finite-lived intangible assets for impairment if impairment indicators arise. The indefinite-lived intangible assets are tested for impairment annually or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of the assets may not be recoverable. Although we recorded no impairment of intangible assets for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2019, and 2020 and for the three months ended March 31, 2021, any significant impairment loss charged against our intangible assets could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Furthermore, any acquired business may be involved in legal proceedings originating from historical periods prior to the acquisition, and we may not be fully indemnified, or at all, for any damage to us resulting from such legal proceedings, which could materially and adversely affect our financial position and results of operations.
If we update our manufacturing equipment more quickly than expected, we may have to shorten the useful lives of any equipment to be retired as a result of any such update, and the resulting acceleration in our depreciation could negatively affect our financial results.
We have invested and expect to continue to invest significantly in what we believe is modern tooling, machinery, and other manufacturing equipment for the product lines where Li ONE is manufactured, and we depreciate the cost of such equipment over their expected useful lives. However, manufacturing technology may evolve rapidly, and we may decide to update our manufacturing process with advanced equipment more quickly than expected. Moreover, as our engineering and manufacturing expertise and efficiency increase, we may be able to manufacture our products using less of our installed equipment. The useful life of any equipment that would be retired early as a result would be shortened, causing the depreciation on such equipment to be accelerated, and to the extent we own such equipment, our results of operations could be negatively impacted. We are planning on the reconfiguration of our Changzhou factory for our new model pipeline, especially the full-size premium SUV based on the X platform to be launched in 2022. The investment for the expansion and reconfiguration of our Changzhou factory is estimated to be approximately RMB1.6 billion, over 65% will be used for the purchase of production facilities and the remaining will be used for construction of manufacturing plants. Our increased investment in the manufacturing plants will result in an increase in depreciation cost upon expansion of our Changzhou factory, which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
Certain of our directors have been named as defendants in several shareholder class action lawsuits.
Several putative shareholder class action lawsuits have been filed against certain of our directors. We are currently unable to estimate the potential loss, if any, associated with the resolution of such lawsuits, if they proceed. We anticipate that we or certain of our directors or officers may be a target for lawsuits in the future, including putative class action lawsuits brought by our shareholders and lawsuits against our directors and officers as a result of their position in other public companies. We cannot assure you that our directors or officers and we will be able to prevail in their defense or reverse any unfavorable judgment on appeal, and our directors or officers and we may decide to settle lawsuits on unfavorable terms. Any adverse outcome of these cases, including any plaintiffs’ appeal of the judgment in these
 
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cases, could result in payments of substantial monetary damages or fines, or changes to our business practices, and thus materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operation, cash flows, and reputation. In addition, we cannot assure you that our insurance carriers will cover all or part of the defense costs, or any liabilities that may arise from these matters. The litigation process may utilize a significant portion of our cash resources and divert management’s attention from the day-to-day operations of our company, all of which could harm our business. We also may be subject to claims for indemnification related to these matters, and we cannot predict the impact that indemnification claims may have on our business or financial performance.
Risks Relating to Our Corporate Structure
If the PRC government deems that our contractual arrangements with our VIEs do not comply with PRC regulatory restrictions on foreign investment in the relevant industries, or if these regulations or the interpretation of existing regulations change in the future, we could be subject to severe penalties or be forced to relinquish our interests in those operations.
Current PRC laws and regulations place certain restrictions on foreign ownership of certain areas of businesses. For example, pursuant to the 2020 Negative List, foreign investors are not allowed to own more than 50% of the equity interests in a value-added telecommunication service provider (excluding e-commerce, domestic multiparty communications, store-and-forward and call centers). In addition, foreign investors are prohibited from investing in companies engaged in internet culture businesses (except for music) and radio and television program production businesses.
We are a Cayman Islands company and our PRC subsidiaries are considered foreign-invested enterprises, or FIEs. Therefore, neither we nor our FIEs are currently eligible to apply for the required licenses for providing internet information services or other value-added telecommunication services or conduct other businesses that foreign-owned companies are prohibited or restricted from conducting in China. To comply with applicable PRC laws and regulations, we conduct certain operations in China by entering into a series of contractual arrangements with our VIEs in China and its respective shareholders. In particular, Beijing CHJ holds a Surveying and Mapping Qualification Certificate. Beijing CLX, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Beijing CHJ, currently holds a Value-Added Telecommunication Business Operating License for Internet Information Service, or the ICP License, a Value-Added Telecommunication Business Operating License for Information Service (excluding internet information service), an Internet Culture Business Permit, and an Operating License for the Production and Dissemination of Radio and Television Programs. In addition, we manufacture our vehicles through Chongqing Lixiang, which is qualified to manufacture ICE vehicles and NEVs. Each of Beijing CHJ and one of our PRC subsidiaries holds 50% of the equity interest of Chongqing Lixiang. For a detailed description of these contractual arrangements, see “Item 4. Information on the Company—C. Organizational Structure” in our 2020 Form 20-F, which is incorporated in this prospectus supplement by reference. We conduct our operations in China through (i) our PRC subsidiaries and (ii) our VIEs with which we maintained these contractual arrangements. Investors in our Class A ordinary shares or the ADSs thus are not purchasing equity interest in our VIEs in China but instead are purchasing equity interest in a Cayman Islands holding company with no equity ownership in our VIEs .
In the opinion of Han Kun Law Offices, our PRC legal counsel, (i) the ownership structures of our WFOE, Wheels Technology, and our VIEs in China, both currently and immediately after giving effect to the Global Offering, are not in violation of any explicit provisions of PRC laws and regulations currently in effect; and (ii) each of the contracts among the WFOE, our VIEs, and their respective registered shareholders governed by PRC laws is valid and binding. However, we have been advised by our PRC legal counsel that there are substantial uncertainties regarding the interpretation and application of current and future PRC laws, regulations, and rules, and there can be no assurance that the PRC regulatory authorities will take a view that is consistent with the opinion of our PRC legal counsel.
Our holding company in the Cayman Islands, our VIEs, and investments in our company face uncertainty about potential future actions by the PRC government that could affect the enforceability of the contractual arrangements with our VIEs and, consequently, the business, financial condition, and results of operations of our VIEs and our company as a group. It is uncertain whether any new PRC
 
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laws or regulations relating to VIE structures will be adopted or if adopted, what they would provide. In particular, the National People’s Congress approved the Foreign Investment Law, or the 2019 PRC Foreign Investment Law on March 15, 2019, which came into effect on January 1, 2020. In addition, the PRC State Council approved the Implementation Rules of Foreign Investment Law on December 26, 2019, which came into effect on January 1, 2020. There are uncertainties as to how the 2019 PRC Foreign Investment Law and its Implementation Rules would be further interpreted and implemented, if it would represent a major change to the laws and regulations relating to the VIE structures. See
“—Risks Relating to Doing Business in China—Substantial uncertainties exist with respect to the interpretation and implementation of newly enacted 2019 PRC Foreign Investment Law and its Implementation Rules and how they may impact the viability of our current corporate structure, corporate governance, and operations in our 2020 Form 20-F, which is incorporated in this prospectus supplement by reference.”
If the ownership structure, contractual arrangements, and businesses of our PRC subsidiaries or our VIEs are found to be in violation of any existing or future PRC laws or regulations, or our PRC subsidiaries or our VIEs fail to obtain or maintain any of the required permits or approvals, the relevant PRC regulatory authorities would have broad discretion to take action in dealing with such violations or failures, including:

revoking the business licenses or operating licenses of such entities;

shutting down our servers or blocking our website or our mobile application, or discontinuing or placing restrictions or onerous conditions on our operation through any transactions between our PRC subsidiaries and VIEs;

imposing fines, confiscating the income from our PRC subsidiaries or our VIEs, or imposing other requirements with which we or our VIEs may not be able to comply;

requiring us to restructure our ownership structure or operations, including terminating the contractual arrangements with our VIEs and deregistering the equity pledge of our VIEs, which in turn would affect our ability to consolidate, derive economic interests from, or exert effective control over our VIEs; or

restricting or prohibiting our use of the proceeds of our the Global Offering to finance our business and operations in China, and taking other regulatory or enforcement actions that could be harmful to our business.
Any of these actions could cause significant disruption to our business operations and severely damage our reputation, which would in turn materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. If any of these occurrences results in our inability to direct the activities of our VIEs that most significantly impact their economic performance, or our failure to receive the economic benefits from our VIEs, we may not be able to consolidate the entities in our consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP.
We rely on contractual arrangements with our VIEs and their respective shareholders to exercise control over our business, which may not be as effective as direct ownership in providing operational control.
We have relied and expect to continue to rely on contractual arrangements with our VIEs and their respective shareholders to conduct a portion of our operations in China. For a description of these contractual arrangements, see “C Item 4. Information on the Company—C. Organizational Structure” in our 2020 Form 20-F, which is incorporated in this prospectus supplement by reference. The respective shareholders of our VIEs may not act in the best interests of our company or may not perform their obligations under these contracts. If we had direct ownership of our VIEs, we would be able to exercise our rights as a shareholder to control our VIEs to excise rights of shareholders to effect changes in the board of directors of our VIEs, which in turn could implement changes, subject to any applicable fiduciary obligations, at the management and operational level. However, under the contractual arrangements, we would rely on legal remedies under PRC laws for breach of contract in the event that
 
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our VIEs and their respective shareholders did not perform their obligations under the contracts. These legal remedies may not be as effective as direct ownership in providing us with control over our VIEs.
If our VIEs or their respective shareholders fail to perform their obligations under the contractual arrangements, we may have to incur substantial costs and expend additional resources to enforce such arrangements, and rely on legal remedies under PRC laws, including contractual remedies, which may not be sufficient or effective. All of the agreements under our contractual arrangements are governed by and interpreted in accordance with PRC laws, and disputes arising from these contractual arrangements will be resolved through arbitration in China. However, the legal framework and system in China, in particularly those relating to arbitration proceedings, are not as developed as in some other jurisdictions, such as Hong Kong or the United States. As a result, uncertainties in the PRC legal system could limit our ability to enforce these contractual arrangements. Meanwhile, there are very few precedents and little formal guidance as to how contractual arrangements in the context of a VIE should be interpreted or enforced under PRC law. There remain significant uncertainties regarding the ultimate outcome of such arbitration should legal action become necessary. In addition, under PRC laws, rulings by arbitrators are final, parties cannot appeal the arbitration results in courts, and if the losing parties fail to carry out the arbitration awards within a prescribed time limit, the prevailing parties may only enforce the arbitration awards in the PRC courts through arbitration award recognition proceedings, which would require additional expenses and delay. If we are unable to enforce these contractual arrangements, or if we suffer significant delay or face other obstacles in the process of enforcing these contractual arrangements, we may not be able to exert effective control over our VIEs, and our ability to conduct our business may be negatively affected. See “— Risks Relating to Doing Business in China—Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of PRC laws and regulations could limit the legal protections available to you and us” in our 2020 Form 20-F, which is incorporated in this prospectus supplement.
Our ability to enforce the equity pledge agreements between us and our VIEs’ shareholders may be subject to limitations based on PRC laws and regulations.
Pursuant to the equity interest pledge agreements between Beijing CHJ and Xindian Information, our VIEs, their respective shareholders, and Wheels Technology, our wholly-owned PRC subsidiary, each shareholder of Beijing CHJ and Xindian Information agrees to pledge its equity interests in the relevant VIE to our subsidiary to secure Beijing CHJ and Xindian Information’s performance of the relevant VIE’s obligations under the relevant contractual arrangements. The equity interest pledge of shareholders of Beijing CHJ and Xindian Information has been registered with the local branch of the SAMR. The equity interest pledge agreements with our VIEs’ shareholders provide that the pledged equity interest shall constitute continuing security for any and all of the indebtedness, obligations and liabilities under the relevant agreements and the scope of pledge shall not be limited by the amount of the registered capital of that VIE. However, a PRC court may take the position that the amount listed on the equity pledge registration forms represents the full amount of the collateral that has been registered and perfected. If this is the case, the obligations that are supposed to be secured in the equity interest pledge agreements in excess of the amount listed on the equity pledge registration forms could be determined by the PRC court as unsecured debt, which typically takes last priority among creditors.
If we exercise the option to acquire equity ownership of our VIE, the ownership transfer may subject us to certain limitations and substantial costs.
Pursuant to the Provisions on Administration of Foreign-Invested Telecommunications Enterprises, the ultimate foreign equity ownership in a value-added telecommunications services provider cannot exceed 50%. In addition, the main foreign investor who invests in a value-added telecommunications business in China must possess prior experience in operating value-added telecommunications businesses and a proven track record of business operations in such industry, or the Qualification Requirements. Currently, none of the applicable PRC laws, regulations, or rules provides clear guidance or interpretation on the Qualification Requirements. Although we have taken many measures to meet the Qualification Requirements, we still face the risk of not satisfying the requirements promptly. If the PRC laws were revised to allow foreign investors to hold more than 50% of the equity interests of value-added telecommunications enterprises, we might be unable to unwind the Contractual
 
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Arrangements before we are able to comply with the Qualification Requirements, or if we attempt to unwind the Contractual Arrangements before we are able to comply with the Qualification Requirements, we may be ineligible to operate our value-added telecommunication enterprises and may be forced to suspend their operations, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Pursuant to the Contractual Arrangements, Wheels Technology or its designated person has the exclusive right to purchase all or part of the equity interests in our consolidated VIEs at the lower of the amount of their respective paid-in capital in the consolidated VIE and the lowest price permitted under applicable PRC laws. Subject to relevant laws and regulations, the shareholders of our consolidated VIEs shall return any amount of purchase price they have received to Wheels Technology. If such a transfer takes place, the relevant tax authority may ask Wheels Technology to pay enterprise income tax for ownership transfer income with reference to the market value, in which case the amount of tax could be substantial.
The registered shareholders of our VIEs may have potential conflicts of interest with us, which may materially and adversely affect our business and financial condition.
The registered shareholders of Beijing CHJ and Xindian Information, our VIEs, may have potential conflicts of interest with us. These shareholders may breach, or cause our VIEs to breach, or refuse to renew, the existing contractual arrangements we have with them and our VIEs, which would have a material and adverse effect on our ability to effectively control our VIEs and receive economic benefits from them. For example, the shareholders may be able to cause our agreements with our VIEs to be performed in a manner adverse to us by, among other things, failing to remit payments due under the contractual arrangements to us on a timely basis. We cannot assure you that when conflicts of interest arise, any or all of these shareholders will act in the best interests of our company or such conflicts will be resolved in our favor.
Currently, we do not have any arrangements to address potential conflicts of interest between these shareholders and our company, except that we could exercise our purchase option under the exclusive option agreements with these shareholders to request them to transfer all of their equity interests in our VIEs to a PRC entity or individual designated by us, to the extent permitted by PRC law. For individual shareholders who are also our directors, we rely on them to abide by the laws of the Cayman Islands and China, which provide that directors owe a fiduciary duty to the company that requires them to act in good faith and in what they believe to be the best interests of the company and not to use their position for personal gains. There is currently no specific and clear guidance under PRC laws that addresses any conflict between PRC laws and laws of Cayman Islands in respect of any conflict relating to corporate governance. If we cannot resolve any conflict of interest or dispute between us and the shareholders of our VIEs, we would have to rely on legal proceedings, which could result in disruption of our business and subject us to substantial uncertainty as to the outcome of any such legal proceedings.
The shareholders of our VIEs may be involved in personal disputes with third parties or other incidents that may have an adverse effect on their respective equity interests in the relevant VIEs and the validity or enforceability of our contractual arrangements with the relevant entity and its shareholders. For example, in the event that any of the shareholders of our VIEs divorces his or her spouse, the spouse may claim that the equity interest of the relevant VIE held by such shareholder is part of their community property and should be divided between such shareholder and his or her spouse. If such claim is supported by the court, the relevant equity interest may be obtained by the shareholder’s spouse or another third party who is not subject to obligations under our contractual arrangements, which could result in a loss of the effective control over the relevant VIE by us. Similarly, if any of the equity interests of our VIEs is inherited by a third party with whom the current contractual arrangements are not binding, we could lose our control over the relevant VIE or have to maintain such control by incurring unpredictable costs, which could cause significant disruption to our business and operations and harm our financial condition and results of operations.
 
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Our contractual arrangements with our VIEs may be subject to scrutiny by the PRC tax authorities and they may determine that we or our VIEs owe additional taxes, which could negatively affect our financial condition and the value of your investment.
Under applicable PRC laws and regulations, arrangements and transactions among related parties may be subject to audit or challenge by the PRC tax authorities within ten years after the taxable year when the transactions are conducted. The PRC enterprise income tax law requires every enterprise in China to submit its annual enterprise income tax return together with a report on transactions with its related parties to the relevant tax authorities. The tax authorities may impose reasonable adjustments on taxation if they have identified any related party transactions that are inconsistent with arm’s length principles. We may face material and adverse tax consequences if the PRC tax authorities determine that the contractual arrangements were not entered into on an arm’s length basis in such a way as to result in an impermissible reduction in taxes under applicable PRC laws, rules and regulations, and adjust the income of our VIEs in the form of a transfer pricing adjustment. A transfer pricing adjustment could, among other things, result in a reduction of expense deductions recorded by our VIEs for PRC tax purposes, which could in turn increase its tax liabilities without reducing Wheels Technology’s tax expenses. In addition, if Wheels Technology requests the shareholders of our VIEs to transfer their equity interest in our VIEs at nominal or no value pursuant to the contractual agreements, such transfer could be viewed as a gift and subject Wheels Technology to PRC income tax. Furthermore, the PRC tax authorities may impose late payment fees and other penalties on our VIEs for the adjusted but unpaid taxes according to the applicable regulations. Our financial position could be materially and adversely affected if any of our VIEs’ tax liabilities increase or they are required to pay late payment fees and other penalties.
We may lose the ability to use and benefit from assets held by our VIEs that are material to the operation of our business if either of our VIEs goes bankrupt or becomes subject to dissolution or liquidation proceeding.
As part of our contractual arrangements with our VIEs, these entities may in the future hold certain assets that are material to the operation of our business. If either of our VIEs goes bankrupt and all or part of its assets become subject to liens or rights of third-party creditors, we may be unable to continue some or all of our business activities, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Under the contractual arrangements, our VIEs may not, in any manner, sell, transfer, mortgage or dispose of their assets or legal or beneficial interests in the business without our prior consent. If either of our VIEs undergoes voluntary or involuntary liquidation proceeding, unrelated third-party creditors may claim rights to some or all of these assets, thereby hindering our ability to operate our business, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Risks Relating to Doing Business in China
Changes in China’s economic, political or social conditions or government policies could have a material and adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
We expect that substantially all of our revenues will be derived in China and substantially all of our operations, including all of our manufacturing, are conducted in China. Accordingly, our results of operations, financial condition and prospects are influenced by economic, political and legal developments in China. China’s economy differs from the economies of most developed countries in many respects, including with respect to the amount of government involvement, level of development, growth rate, control of foreign exchange and allocation of resources. Although the PRC government has implemented measures emphasizing the utilization of market forces for economic reform, the reduction of state ownership of productive assets, and the establishment of improved corporate governance in business enterprises, a substantial portion of productive assets in China is still owned by the government. The PRC government has significant authority to exert influence on the ability of a China-based company, such as us, to conduct its business. Therefore, investors of our company and our business face potential uncertainty from the PRC government. The PRC government also exercises significant control over China’s economic growth through strategically allocating resources, controlling the payment
 
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of foreign currency-denominated obligations, setting monetary policy and providing preferential treatment to particular industries or companies. While the PRC economy has experienced significant growth over the past decades, that growth has been uneven across different regions and between economic sectors and may not continue, as evidenced by the slowing of the growth of the Chinese economy since 2012. Any adverse changes in economic conditions in China, in the policies of the Chinese government or in the laws and regulations in China could have a material adverse effect on the overall economic growth of China. For example, COVID-19 had a severe and negative impact on the Chinese economy in the first quarter of 2020. Whether this will lead to a prolonged downturn in the Chinese economy is still unknown. Any prolonged economic downturn could adversely affect our business and operating results, leading to reduction in demand for our services and solutions and adversely affect our competitive position.
China’s M&A Rules and certain other PRC regulations establish complex procedures for certain acquisitions of PRC companies by foreign investors, which could make it more difficult for us to pursue growth through acquisitions in China.
A number of PRC laws and regulations have established procedures and requirements that could make merger and acquisition activities in China by foreign investors more time consuming and complex. In addition to the Anti-monopoly Law itself, these include the Regulations on Mergers and Acquisitions of Domestic Enterprises by Foreign Investors, or the M&A Rules, adopted by six PRC regulatory agencies in 2006 and amended in 2009, and the Rules of the Ministry of Commerce on Implementation of Security Review System of Mergers and Acquisitions of Domestic Enterprises by Foreign Investors, or the Security Review Rules, promulgated in 2011. These laws and regulations impose requirements in some instances that the Ministry of Commerce be notified in advance of any change-of-control transaction in which a foreign investor takes control of a PRC domestic enterprise. In addition, the Anti-Monopoly Law requires that the anti-monopoly enforcement agency be notified in advance of any concentration of undertaking if certain thresholds are triggered. On February 7, 2021, the Anti-Monopoly Committee of the State Council published the Anti-Monopoly Guidelines for the Internet Platform Economy Sector, which stipulates that any concentration of undertakings involving variable interest entities is subject to anti-monopoly review. Moreover, the Security Review Rules specify that mergers and acquisitions by foreign investors that raise “national defense and security” concerns and mergers and acquisitions through which foreign investors may acquire de facto control over domestic enterprises that raise “national security” concerns are subject to strict review by the Ministry of Commerce, and prohibit any attempt to bypass a security review, including by structuring the transaction through a proxy or contractual control arrangement. On December 19, 2020, the NDRC and the Ministry of Commerce jointly issued the Measures for the Security Review for Foreign Investment, which took effect on January 18, 2021. These measures set forth the provisions concerning the security review mechanism on foreign investment, including, among others, the types of investments subject to review, and the review scopes and procedures. In the future, we may grow our business by acquiring complementary businesses. Complying with the requirements of the relevant regulations to complete such transactions could be time consuming, and any required approval processes, including approval from the Ministry of Commerce and other PRC government authorities, may delay or inhibit our ability to complete such transactions, which could affect our ability to expand our business or maintain our market share.
The approval of the CSRC or other PRC government authorities may be required in connection with this offering under PRC law, and, if required, we cannot predict whether or for how long we will be able to obtain such approval.
The M&A Rules requires an overseas special purpose vehicle formed for listing purposes through acquisitions of PRC domestic companies and controlled by PRC persons or entities to obtain the approval of the CSRC prior to the listing and trading of such special purpose vehicle’s securities on an overseas stock exchange. The interpretation and application of the regulations remain unclear, and this offering may ultimately require approval of the CSRC. If the CSRC approval is required, it is uncertain whether we can or how long it will take us to obtain the approval even if we obtain such CSRC approval, such CSRC approval could be rescinded. Any failure to obtain or delay in obtaining the CSRC approval for this offering, or a rescission of such CSRC approval if obtained by us, would subject us to sanctions
 
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imposed by the CSRC or other PRC regulatory authorities, which could include fines and penalties on our operations in China, restrictions or limitations on our ability to pay dividends outside of China, and other forms of sanctions that may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Our PRC legal counsel has advised us that, based on its understanding of the current PRC laws and regulations, we will not be required to submit an application to the CSRC for the approval of the listing and trading of our Class A ordinary shares because (i) the CSRC currently has not issued any definitive rule or interpretation concerning whether offerings like ours under this prospectus supplement are subject to this regulation, (ii) our wholly-owned PRC subsidiaries were not established through a merger or requisition of the equity or assets of a “PRC domestic company” as such term is defined under the M&A Rules, and (iii) no provision in this regulation clearly classifies contractual arrangements as a type of transaction subject to its regulation. However, we cannot assure you that relevant PRC government authorities, including the CSRC, would reach the same conclusion as our PRC legal counsel. If it is determined that the CSRC approval is required for this offering, we may face regulatory actions or other sanctions from the CSRC or other PRC regulatory authorities. Recently, the relevant PRC government authorities issued Opinions on Strictly Cracking Down Illegal Securities Activities in Accordance with the Law. These opinions emphasized the need to strengthen the administration over illegal securities activities and the supervision on overseas listings by China-based companies and proposed to take effective measures, such as promoting the construction of relevant regulatory systems to deal with the risks and incidents faced by China-based overseas-listed companies. As these opinions are recently issued, official guidance and related implementation rules have not been issued yet and the interpretation of these opinions remains unclear at this stage. As such, we have not submitted any application to the CSRC or other PRC government authorities for the listing and trading of our Class A ordinary shares. We cannot assure you that any new rules or regulations promulgated in the future will not impose additional requirements on us. If it is determined in the future that approval from the CSRC or other regulatory authorities or other procedures are required for this offering, it is uncertain whether we can or how long it will take us to obtain such approval or complete such procedures and any such approval or completion could be rescinded. Any failure to obtain or delay in obtaining such approval or completing such procedures for this offering, or a rescission of any such approval if obtained by us, would subject us to sanctions by the CSRC or other PRC regulatory authorities for failure to seek CSRC approval or other government authorization for this offering. These regulatory authorities may impose fines and penalties on our operations in China, limit our ability to pay dividends outside of China, limit our operating privileges in China, delay or restrict the repatriation of the proceeds from this offering into China or take other actions that could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects, as well as the trading price of our shares. The CSRC or other PRC regulatory authorities also may take actions requiring us, or making it advisable for us, to halt this offering before settlement and delivery of the shares offered hereby. Consequently, if you engage in market trading or other activities in anticipation of and prior to settlement and delivery, you do so at the risk that settlement and delivery may not occur. In addition, if the CSRC or other regulatory authorities later promulgate new rules or explanations requiring that we obtain their approvals or accomplish the required filing or other regulatory procedures for this offering, we may be unable to obtain a waiver of such approval requirements, if and when procedures are established to obtain such a waiver. Any uncertainties or negative publicity regarding such approval requirement could materially and adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition, reputation, and the trading price of the shares.
Our ADSs may be delisted under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act if the PCAOB is unable to inspect auditors who are located in China. The delisting of our ADSs, or the threat of their being delisted, may materially and adversely affect the value of your investment. Additionally, the inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections deprives our investors with the benefits of such inspections.
The Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, or the HFCA Act, was enacted on December 18, 2020. According to the HFCA Act, if the SEC determines that we have filed audit reports issued by a registered public accounting firm that has not been subject to inspection by the PCAOB for three consecutive years beginning in 2021, the SEC will prohibit our shares or ADSs from being traded on a national securities exchange or in the over-the-counter trading market in the United States.
 
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Our auditor, the independent registered public accounting firm that issues the audit report included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement, as an auditor of companies that are traded publicly in the United States and a firm registered with the PCAOB, is subject to laws in the United States pursuant to which the PCAOB conducts regular inspections to assess its compliance with the applicable professional standards. Since our auditor is located in China, a jurisdiction where the PCAOB has been unable to conduct inspections without the approval of the PRC authorities, our auditor is currently not inspected by the PCAOB.
On March 24, 2021, the SEC adopted interim final rules relating to the implementation of certain disclosure and documentation requirements of the HFCA Act. We will be required to comply with these rules if the SEC identifies us as having a “non-inspection” year under a process to be subsequently established by the SEC. The SEC is assessing how to implement other requirements of the HFCA Act, including the listing and trading prohibition requirements described above.
On June 22, 2021, the U.S. Senate passed a bill which, if passed by the U.S. House of Representatives and signed into law, would reduce the number of consecutive non-inspection years required for triggering the prohibitions under the HFCA Act from three years to two.
The SEC may propose additional regulatory or legislative requirements or guidance that could impact us if our auditor is not subject to PCAOB inspection. For example, on August 6, 2020, the President’s Working Group on Financial Markets, or the PWG, issued the Report on Protecting United States Investors from Significant Risks from Chinese Companies to the then President of the United States. This report recommended the SEC implement five recommendations to address companies from jurisdictions that do not provide the PCAOB with sufficient access to fulfill its statutory mandate. Some of the concepts of these recommendations were implemented with the enactment of the HFCA Act. However, some of the recommendations were more stringent than the HFCA Act. For example, if a company was not subject to PCAOB inspection, the report recommended that the transition period before a company would be delisted would end on January 1, 2022.
The SEC has announced that the SEC staff is preparing a consolidated proposal for the rules regarding the implementation of the HFCA Act and to address the recommendations in the PWG report. It is unclear when the SEC will complete its rulemaking and when such rules will become effective and what, if any, of the PWG recommendations will be adopted. The implications of this possible regulation in addition the requirements of the HFCA Act are uncertain. Such uncertainty could cause the market price of our ADSs to be materially and adversely affected, and our securities could be delisted or prohibited from being traded “over-the-counter” earlier than would be required by the HFCA Act. If our securities are unable to be listed on another securities exchange by then, such a delisting would substantially impair your ability to sell or purchase our ADSs when you wish to do so, and the risk and uncertainty associated with a potential delisting would have a negative impact on the price of our ADSs.
The PCAOB ‘s inability to conduct inspections in China prevents it from fully evaluating the audits and quality control procedures of our independent registered public accounting firm. As a result, we and investors in our ordinary shares or ADSs are deprived of the benefits of such PCAOB inspections. The inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections of auditors in China makes it more difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of our independent registered public accounting firm’s audit procedures or quality control procedures as compared to auditors outside of China that are subject to the PCAOB inspections, which could cause investors and potential investors in our stock to lose confidence in our audit procedures and reported financial information and the quality of our financial statements.
In May 2013, the PCAOB announced that it had entered into a Memorandum of Understanding on Enforcement Cooperation with the CSRC and the PRC Ministry of Finance, which establishes a cooperative framework between the parties for the production and exchange of audit documents relevant to investigations undertaken by the PCAOB in China or by the CSRC or the PRC Ministry of Finance in the United States. The PCAOB continues to be in discussions with the CSRC and the PRC Ministry of Finance to permit joint inspections in China of audit firms that are registered with the PCAOB and audit Chinese companies that trade on U.S. exchanges.
 
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Risks Relating to Our Class A Ordinary Shares and ADSs
Our dual-class voting structure will limit your ability to influence corporate matters and could discourage others from pursuing any change of control transactions that holders of our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs may view as beneficial.
Pursuant to our fourth memorandum and articles of association, our authorized and issued ordinary shares consist of Class A ordinary shares and Class B ordinary shares (with certain shares remaining undesignated, with power for our directors to designate and issue such classes of shares as they think fit). In respect of matters requiring the votes of shareholders, holders of Class A ordinary shares and Class B ordinary shares vote together as a single class except as may otherwise be required by law, and holders of Class A ordinary shares will be entitled to one vote per share while holders of Class B ordinary shares will be entitled to ten votes per share. Each Class B ordinary share is convertible into one Class A ordinary share at any time by the holder thereof, while Class A ordinary shares are not convertible into Class B ordinary shares under any circumstances. Upon (i) any direct or indirect sale, transfer, assignment, or disposition of Class B ordinary shares by a holder thereof to any person or entity that is not an affiliate of Mr. Xiang Li, or (ii) the direct or indirect sale, transfer, assignment, or disposition of a majority of the issued and outstanding voting securities of, or the direct or indirect transfer or assignment of the voting power attached to such voting securities through voting proxy or otherwise, or the direct or indirect sale, transfer, assignment, or disposition of all or substantially all of the assets of, a holder of Class B ordinary shares that is an entity to any person that is not an affiliate of Mr. Xiang Li, such Class B ordinary shares are automatically and immediately converted into an equal number of Class A ordinary shares.
Immediately following the completion of the Global Offering, Mr. Xiang Li, our chairman and chief executive officer, beneficially owned 355,812,080 Class B ordinary shares and 108,557,400 CEO Award Shares (which are Class A ordinary shares with one vote per share), representing 69.8% of the aggregate voting power of our total issued and outstanding ordinary shares assuming the option to purchase additional Class A ordinary shares is not exercised, due to the disparate voting powers associated with our dual-class voting structure. See “Principal Shareholders.” Mr. Li will continue to have considerable influence over matters requiring shareholder approval, such as electing directors and approving material mergers, acquisitions, or other business combination transactions. This concentration of ownership may discourage, delay, or prevent a change of control of our company, which could have the effect of depriving our other shareholders of the opportunity to receive a premium for their shares as part of a sale of our company and may reduce the price of our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs. This concentrated control will limit your ability to influence corporate matters and could discourage others from pursuing any potential merger, takeover, or other change of control transactions that holders of Class A ordinary shares or ADSs may view as beneficial.
Certain principal shareholders have substantial influence over our key corporate matters and will continue to have such influence following the Global Offering.
Certain principal shareholders of our company have certain special rights with respect to our key corporate matters, in addition to voting power based on beneficial ownership in our company. Pursuant to our fourth amended and restated memorandum and articles of association, Amp Lee Ltd., an entity beneficially owned by Mr. Xiang Li, our chairman and chief executive officer, is entitled to appoint, remove, and replace at least one director, subject to certain conditions. Pursuant to an investor rights agreement dated July 9, 2020 with Inspired Elite Investments Limited, our shareholder and a wholly owned subsidiary of Meituan, Inspired Elite Investments Limited and certain related entities are entitled to a series of special rights, including the right to appoint, remove, and replace one director as well as to appoint the chairman of the board of directors, certain consent rights, and right of first refusal on change of control. These special rights enable these principal shareholders to have substantial influence over our key corporate matters and could discourage others from pursuing any change of control transaction that holders of our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs may view as beneficial. We will put forth a resolution at the first general shareholders meeting after the Listing to remove from our memorandum and articles of association the aforementioned special right of Amp Lee Ltd. and will, prior to the Listing, irrevocably undertake to the Stock Exchange to treat such special rights as terminated upon the Listing and before the existing memorandum and articles of associations are formally amended. The
 
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special rights, except the right of first refusal on change of control, of Inspired Elite Investments Limited and certain related entities will be automatically terminated upon the Listing.
Because we do not expect to pay dividends in the foreseeable future after the Global Offering, you must rely on price appreciation of our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs for return on your investment.
We currently intend to retain most, if not all, of our available funds and any future earnings after the Global Offering to fund the development and growth of our business. As a result, we do not expect to pay any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Therefore, you should not rely on an investment in our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs as a source for any future dividend income.
Our board of directors has complete discretion as to whether to distribute dividends. Our shareholders may also by ordinary resolution declare dividends, but no dividend shall exceed the amount recommended by our board of directors. Even if our board of directors decides to declare and pay dividends, the timing, amount and form of future dividends, if any, will depend on, among other things, our future results of operations and cash flow, our capital requirements and surplus, the amount of distributions, if any, received by us from our subsidiary, our financial condition, contractual restrictions and other factors deemed relevant by our board of directors. Accordingly, the return on your investment in our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs will likely depend entirely upon any future price appreciation of our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs. There is no guarantee that our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs will appreciate in value or even maintain the price at which you purchased the Class A ordinary shares or ADSs. You may not realize a return on your investment in our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs and you may even lose your entire investment in our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs.
We have not determined a specific use for a portion of the net proceeds from the Global Offering, and we may use these proceeds in ways with which you may not agree.
We have not determined a specific use for a portion of the net proceeds of the Global Offering, and our management will have considerable discretion in deciding how to apply these proceeds. You will not have the opportunity to assess whether the proceeds are being used appropriately before you make your investment decision. You must rely on the judgment of our management regarding the application of the net proceeds of the Global Offering. We cannot assure you that the net proceeds will be used in a manner that will improve our results of operations or increase our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs price, nor that these net proceeds will be placed only in investments that generate income or appreciate in value.
Our fourth amended and restated memorandum and articles of association give us power to take certain actions that could discourage a third party from acquiring us, which could limit our shareholders’ opportunity to sell their shares, including Class A ordinary shares represented by the ADSs, at a premium.
Our fourth amended and restated memorandum and articles of association give us power to take certain actions that could have the effect of depriving our shareholders of an opportunity to sell their shares at a premium over prevailing market prices by discouraging third parties from seeking to obtain control of our company in a tender offer or similar transaction. Our board of directors has the authority, without further action by our shareholders, to issue preferred shares in one or more series and to fix their designations, powers, preferences, privileges, and relative participating, optional or special rights and the qualifications, limitations or restrictions, including dividend rights, conversion rights, voting rights, terms of redemption and liquidation preferences, any or all of which may be greater than the rights associated with our Class A ordinary shares, in the form of ADSs or otherwise. Preferred shares could be issued quickly with terms calculated to delay or prevent a change in control of our company or make removal of management more difficult. If our board of directors decides to issue preferred shares, the price of our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs may fall and the voting and other rights of the holders of our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs may be materially and adversely affected. However, our exercise of any such power that may limit the ability of others to acquire control of our company or cause us to engage in change-of-control transactions under our memorandum and articles of association after the Global Offering will be subject to our overriding obligations to comply with all applicable Hong Kong
 
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laws and regulations, the Hong Kong Listing Rules, and the Codes on Takeovers and Mergers and Share Buy-backs. We will, at the first general meeting to be convened in or before January 2022, propose to our shareholders certain amendments to our memorandum and articles of association, including removing the directors’ discretion to, for the purpose of variation of rights attached to any class of shares, treat all the classes or any two or more classes as forming one class if they consider that all such classes would be affected in the same way by the proposals under consideration under article 19 of the memorandum and articles of association, the directors’ powers to authorize the division of Shares into any number of classes and to determine the relative rights and obligations as between the different classes and to issue such shares with preferred or other rights that may be greater than the rights of the Class A ordinary shares under article 9 of the existing memorandum and articles of association, as well as making the directors’ powers to issue preferred shares under article 9 to be subject to the memorandum and articles of association, compliance with the Hong Kong Listing Rules and the Takeovers Code and the conditions that (i) no new class of shares with voting rights superior to those of Class A ordinary shares will be created and (ii) any variations in the relative rights as between the different classes will not result in creating new class of shares with voting rights superior to those of Class A Ordinary Shares.
The conversion of the 2028 Notes or any convertible notes that we may issue in the future may dilute the ownership interest of the existing shareholders and existing ADS holders, including holders who had previously converted their notes.
We issued US$862.5 million 0.25% convertible senior notes due 2028 in April 2021, which may be converted, at an initial conversion rate of 35.2818 ADSs per US$1,000 principal amount of notes (which represents an initial conversion price of US$28.34 per ADS) at each holder’s option at any time on or after November 1, 2027, until the close of business on the second scheduled trading day immediately preceding the maturity date of May 1, 2028, or at the option of the holders upon satisfaction of certain conditions and during certain periods prior to the close of business on the business day immediately preceding November 1, 2027. As the conversion of the 2028 Notes may take place anytime during such periods if the relevant conditions are fulfilled, the conversion of the 2028 Notes and any convertible notes that we may issue in the future will dilute the ownership interests of existing shareholders and existing ADS holders. Any sales in the public market of the ADSs issuable upon such conversion may increase the opportunities to create short positions with respect to the ADSs, which could adversely affect prevailing trading prices of our ADSs. In addition, the existence of such convertible notes may encourage short selling by market participants because the conversion of such notes could depress the price of our ADSs. The price of our ADSs could be affected by possible sales of our ADSs by investors who view the convertible notes as a more attractive means of equity participation in us and by hedging or arbitrage trading activity, which we expect to occur involving our ADSs.
We may not have the ability to raise the funds necessary to settle conversion of the notes in cash, to repurchase the notes upon a fundamental change, to repurchase notes on May 1, 2024 and May 1, 2026, and our future debt may contain limitations on our ability to pay cash upon conversion or to repurchase the notes.
Holders of the 2028 Notes have the right to require us to repurchase their notes on May 1, 2024 and May 1, 2026 or upon the occurrence of a fundamental change (as defined in the indenture), in each case, at a repurchase price equal to 100% of the principal amount of the notes to be repurchased, plus accrued and unpaid interest. We may not have enough available cash or be able to obtain financing at the time we are required to make repurchases of the notes surrendered therefor or to settle the notes being converted. Our failure to repurchase the notes at a time when the repurchase is required by the indenture governing the notes or to pay any cash payable on future conversions of the notes as required by the indenture governing the notes would constitute a default under the indenture. A default under the indenture or a fundamental change itself could also lead to a default under agreements governing any of our future indebtedness outstanding at the time. If the repayment of any outstanding future indebtedness were to be accelerated after any applicable notice or grace periods, we may not have sufficient funds to repay the indebtedness and repurchase the notes or make cash payments upon conversions thereof.
 
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Techniques employed by short sellers may drive down the market price of our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs.
Short selling is the practice of selling securities that a seller does not own but rather has borrowed from a third party with the intention of buying identical securities back at a later date to return to the lender. The short seller hopes to profit from a decline in the value of the securities between the sale of the borrowed securities and the purchase of the replacement shares, as the short seller expects to pay less in that purchase than it received in the sale. As it is in the short seller’s interest for the price of the security to decline, many short sellers publish, or arrange for the publication of, negative opinions regarding relevant issuers and their business prospects in order to create negative market momentum and generate profits for themselves after selling securities short.
Public companies listed in the United States that have substantially all of their operations in China have been the subject of short selling. Much of the scrutiny and negative publicity has centered on allegations of a lack of effective internal control over financial reporting resulting in financial and accounting irregularities and mistakes, inadequate corporate governance policies or a lack of adherence thereto and, in many cases, allegations of fraud. As a result, many of these companies are now conducting internal and external investigations into the allegations and, in the interim, are subject to shareholder lawsuits or SEC enforcement actions.
It is not clear what effect such negative publicity could have on us. If we were to become the subject of any unfavorable allegations, whether such allegations are proven to be true or untrue, we could have to expend a significant amount of resources to investigate such allegations or defend ourselves. While we would strongly defend against any such short seller attacks, we may be constrained in the manner in which we can proceed against the relevant short seller by principles of freedom of speech, applicable state law, or issues of commercial confidentiality. Such a situation could be costly and time-consuming and could distract our management from growing our business. Even if such allegations are ultimately proven to be groundless, allegations against us could severely impact our business operations and shareholders’ equity, and any investment in our Class A ordinary shares or ADSs could be greatly reduced or rendered worthless.
Risks Relating to the Global Offering and the Dual Listing
An active trading market for our Class A ordinary shares on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange might not develop or be sustained and trading prices of our Class A ordinary shares might fluctuate significantly.
Following the completion of the Global Offering, we cannot assure you that an active trading market for our Class A ordinary shares on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange will develop or be sustained. The trading price or liquidity for our ADSs on the Nasdaq Global Select Market might not be indicative of those of our Class A ordinary shares on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange following the completion of the Global Offering. If an active trading market of our Class A ordinary shares on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange does not develop or is not sustained after the Global Offering, the market price and liquidity of our Class A ordinary shares could be materially and adversely affected.
In 2014, the Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Shenzhen stock exchanges collaborated to create an inter-exchange trading mechanism called Stock Connect that allows international and PRC investors to trade eligible equity securities listed in each other’s markets through the trading and clearing facilities of their home exchange. Stock Connect currently covers over 2,000 equity securities trading in the Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Shenzhen markets. Stock Connect allows PRC investors to trade directly in eligible equity securities listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, known as Southbound Trading; without Stock Connect, PRC investors would not otherwise have a direct and established means of engaging in Southbound Trading. In October 2019, the Shanghai and Shenzhen stock exchanges separately announced their amended implementation rules in connection with Southbound Trading to include shares of WVR companies to be traded through Stock Connect. However, since these rules are relatively new, there remains uncertainty as to the implementation details, especially with respect to shares of those companies with a secondary or dual-primary listing on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. It is unclear whether and when the Class A ordinary shares of our Company, a WVR company with a dual- primarily listing in Hong Kong upon the Listing, will be eligible to be traded through Stock Connect, if at all.
 
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The ineligibility or any delay of our Class A ordinary shares for trading through Stock Connect will affect PRC investors’ ability to trade our Class A ordinary shares and therefore may limit the liquidity of the trading of our Class A ordinary shares on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.
Since there will be a gap of several days between pricing and trading of our Class A ordinary shares, the price of our ADSs traded on the Nasdaq Global Select Market may fall during this period and could result in a fall in the price of our Class A ordinary shares to be traded on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.
The pricing of the Offer Shares will be determined on the Price Determination Date. However, our Class A ordinary shares will not commence trading on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange until they are delivered, which is expected to be about four Hong Kong business days after the Price Determination Date. As a result, investors may not be able to sell or otherwise deal in our Class A ordinary shares during that period. Accordingly, holders of our Class A ordinary shares are subject to the risk that the trading price of our Class A ordinary shares could fall when trading commences as a result of adverse market conditions or other adverse developments that could occur between the Price Determination Date and the time trading begins. In particular, as our ADSs will continue to be traded on the Nasdaq Global Select Market and their price can be volatile, any fall in the price of our ADSs may result in a fall in the price of our Class A ordinary shares to be traded on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.
There is uncertainty as to whether Hong Kong stamp duty will apply to the trading or conversion of our ADSs following our initial public offering in Hong Kong and listing of our Class A ordinary shares on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.
In connection with our initial public offering of Class A ordinary shares in Hong Kong, we will establish a branch register of members in Hong Kong, or the Hong Kong share register. Our Class A ordinary shares that are traded on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, including those to be issued in this Hong Kong offering and those that may be converted from ADSs, will be registered on the Hong Kong share register, and the trading of these Class A ordinary shares on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange will be subject to the Hong Kong stamp duty. To facilitate ADS-ordinary share conversion and trading between Nasdaq and the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, we also intend to move a portion of our issued Class A ordinary shares from our register of members maintained in the Cayman Islands to our Hong Kong share register.
Under the Hong Kong Stamp Duty Ordinance, any person who effects any sale or purchase of Hong Kong stock, defined as stock the transfer of which is required to be registered in Hong Kong, is required to pay Hong Kong stamp duty. The stamp duty is currently set at a total rate of 0.2% of the greater of the consideration for, or the value of, shares transferred, with 0.1% payable by each of the buyer and the seller.
To the best of our knowledge, Hong Kong stamp duty has not been levied in practice on the trading or conversion of ADSs of companies that are listed in both the United States and Hong Kong and that have maintained all or a portion of their ordinary shares, including ordinary shares underlying ADSs, in their Hong Kong share registers. However, it is unclear whether, as a matter of Hong Kong law, the trading or conversion of ADSs of these dual-listed companies constitutes a sale or purchase of the underlying Hong Kong-registered ordinary shares that is subject to Hong Kong stamp duty. We advise investors to consult their own tax advisors on this matter. If Hong Kong stamp duty is determined by the competent authority to apply to the trading or conversion of our ADSs, the trading price and the value of your investment in our Class A ordinary shares and/or ADSs may be affected.
The characteristics of the U.S. capital markets and the Hong Kong capital markets are different.
The Nasdaq Global Select Market and the Hong Kong Stock Exchange have different trading hours, trading characteristics (including trading volume and liquidity), trading and listing rules, and investor bases (including different levels of retail and institutional participation). As a result of these differences, the trading prices of our Class A ordinary shares and the ADSs representing them might not be the same, even allowing for currency differences. Fluctuations in the price of the ADSs due to circumstances peculiar to its home capital market could materially and adversely affect the price of the Class A ordinary shares. Because of the different characteristics of the U.S. and Hong Kong equity
 
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markets, the historic market prices of the ADSs may not be indicative of the performance of our securities (including the ordinary shares) after the Global Offering.
Exchange between our Class A ordinary shares and the ADSs may adversely affect the liquidity or trading price of each other.
The ADSs are currently traded on the Nasdaq Global Select Market. Subject to compliance with U.S. securities laws and the terms of the deposit agreement, holders of our Class A ordinary shares may deposit Class A ordinary shares with the depositary in exchange for the issuance of the ADSs. Any holder of ADSs may also withdraw the underlying Class A ordinary shares represented by the ADSs pursuant to the terms of the deposit agreement for trading on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. In the event that a substantial number of Class A ordinary shares are deposited with the depositary in exchange for ADSs or vice versa, the liquidity and trading price of our Class A ordinary shares on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange and the ADSs on the Nasdaq Global Select Market may be adversely affected.
The time required for the exchange between our Class A ordinary shares and the ADSs might be longer than expected and investors might not be able to settle or effect any sale of their securities during this period, and the exchange of Class A ordinary shares into ADSs involves costs.
There is no direct trading or settlement between the Nasdaq Global Select Market and the Hong Kong Stock Exchange on which the ADSs and our Class A ordinary shares are respectively traded. In addition, the time differences between Hong Kong and New York, unforeseen market circumstances, or other factors may delay the deposit of Class A ordinary shares in exchange for the ADSs or the withdrawal of Class A ordinary shares underlying the ADSs. Investors will be prevented from settling or effecting the sale of their securities during such periods of delay. In addition, we cannot assure you that any exchange for Class A ordinary shares into ADSs (and vice versa) will be completed in accordance with the timelines that investors may anticipate.
Furthermore, the depositary for the ADSs is entitled to charge holders fees for various services including for the issuance of ADSs upon deposit of Class A ordinary shares, cancelation of ADSs, distributions of cash dividends or other cash distributions, distributions of ADSs pursuant to share dividends or other free share distributions, distributions of securities other than ADSs, and annual service fees. As a result, shareholders who exchange Class A ordinary shares into ADSs, and vice versa, may not achieve the level of economic return the shareholders may anticipate.
We may be subject to securities litigation, which is expensive and could divert management attention.
Companies that have experienced volatility in the volume and market price of their shares have been subject to an increased incidence of securities class action litigation. We may be the target of this type of litigation in the future. Securities litigation against us could result in substantial costs and divert our management’s attention from other business concerns, and, if adversely determined, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
As the public offering price is substantially higher than our net tangible book value per ordinary share, you will incur immediate and substantial dilution.
If you purchase ordinary shares in the Global Offering, you will pay more for your Class A ordinary shares than the amount paid by existing holders for their Class A ordinary shares or ADSs on a per ordinary share basis. As a result, you will experience immediate and substantial dilution after giving effect to the Global Offering. In addition, you will experience further dilution to the extent that our ordinary shares are issued upon the exercise of share options or vesting of restricted share units. All of the ordinary shares issuable upon the exercise of currently outstanding share options will be issued at a purchase price on a per ordinary share basis that is less than the public offering price per ordinary share in the Global Offering.
 
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CERTAIN FINANCIAL DATA
The following selected consolidated statements of comprehensive loss data and selected consolidated cash flow data for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2019, and 2020 and selected consolidated balance sheets data as of December 31, 2019 and 2020 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement. The following selected consolidated statements of comprehensive loss data and selected consolidated cash flow data for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2021 and selected consolidated balance sheets data as of March 31, 2021 have been derived from our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement. The following selected consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2018 has been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements that are not included in this prospectus supplement. Apart from the adoption of ASU No. 2016-13, “Financial Instruments—Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments” on January 1, 2021, using a modified retrospective approach, the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared on the same basis as our audited consolidated financial statements and include all adjustments, consisting only of normal and recurring adjustments, that we consider necessary for a fair statement of our financial position and results of operations for the periods presented. The consolidated financial information should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement and “Financial Information” in Exhibit 99.1 to the Super 6-K, as amended, which is incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus. Our consolidated financial statements are prepared and presented in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, or U.S. GAAP. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of results expected for future periods.
The following table presents certain consolidated statements of comprehensive loss data for the periods indicated.
For the Year Ended December 31,
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
2018
2019
2020
2020
2021
RMB
RMB
RMB
US$
RMB
RMB
US$
(in thousands, except for share and per share data)
(unaudited)
Selected Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Loss Data:
Revenues:
–Vehicle sales
280,967 9,282,703 1,416,817 841,058 3,463,673 528,660
–Other sales and services
3,400 173,906 26,543 10,617 111,528 17,022
Total revenues
284,367 9,456,609 1,443,360 851,675 3,575,201 545,682
Cost of sales(1):
–Vehicle sales
(279,555) (7,763,628) (1,184,961) (769,996) (2,878,994) (439,420)
–Other sales and services
(4,907) (143,642) (21,924) (13,391) (79,474) (12,130)
Total cost of sales
(284,462) (7,907,270) (1,206,885) (783,387) (2,958,468) (451,550)
Gross (loss)/profit
(95) 1,549,339 236,475 68,288 616,733 94,132
Operating expenses:
–Research and development(1)
(793,717) (1,169,140) (1,099,857) (167,871) (189,690) (514,500) (78,528)
–Selling, general and administrative(1)
(337,200) (689,379) (1,118,819) (170,765) (112,761) (509,924) (77,830)
Total operating expenses
(1,130,917) (1,858,519) (2,218,676) (338,636) (302,451) (1,024,424) (156,358)
Loss from operations
(1,130,917) (1,858,614) (669,337) (102,161) (234,163) (407,691) (62,226)
Other (expense)/income:
Interest expense
(63,467) (83,667) (66,916) (10,213) (19,635) (14,582) (2,226)
Interest income
3,582 30,256 41,316 6,306 7,595 29,694 4,532
Investment income/(loss),
net
68,135 49,375 213,600 32,602 (23,770) 148,778 22,708
 
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For the Year Ended December 31,
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
2018
2019
2020
2020
2021
RMB
RMB
RMB
US$
RMB
RMB
US$
(in thousands, except for share and per share data)
(unaudited)
Share of loss of equity method investees
(35,826) (162,725) (2,520) (385) (420) (322) (49)
Foreign exchange (loss)/gain, net
(3,726) 31,977 (6,719) (1,026) 1,970 (93,494) (14,270)
Changes in fair value of warrants and derivative liabilities
(426,425) 272,327 41,565 176,283
Others, net
(3,077) 1,949 29,372 4,483 654 3,605 550
Loss before income tax expense
(1,165,296) (2,417,874) (188,877) (28,829) (91,486) (334,012) (50,981)
Net loss
(1,532,318) (2,438,536) (151,657) (23,148) (77,113) (359,967) (54,943)
Net loss attributable to
ordinary shareholders of
Li Auto Inc.
(1,849,638) (3,281,607) (791,985) (120,881) (233,732) (359,967) (54,943)
Weighted average number
of ordinary shares used
in computing net loss per
share
Basic and diluted
255,000,000 255,000,000 870,003,278 870,003,278 255,000,000 1,809,393,256 1,809,393,256
Net loss per share attributable to ordinary shareholders
Basic and diluted
(7.25) (12.87) (0.91) (0.14) (0.91) (0.20) (0.03)
Net loss
(1,532,318) (2,438,536) (151,657) (23,148) (77,113) (359,967) (54,943)
Total other comprehensive
income/(loss), net of
tax
12,954 2,851 (1,020,728) (155,794) (5,088) 107,644 16,430
Total comprehensive loss, net of tax
(1,519,364) (2,435,685) (1,172,385) (178,942) (82,201) (252,323) (38,513)
Comprehensive loss attributable to ordinary shareholders of Li Auto
Inc.
(1,836,684) (3,278,756) (1,812,713) (276,675) (238,820) (252,323) (38,513)
Note:
(1)
Share-based compensation expenses were allocated as follows:
For the Year Ended
December 31,
For the Three Months Ended
March 31,
2018
2019
2020
2020
2021
RMB
RMB
RMB
US$
RMB
RMB
US$
(in thousands)
(unaudited)
Cost of sales
1,515 231 6,209 948
Research and development expenses
60,789 9,278 116,609 17,798
Selling, general and administrative expenses
80,491 12,285 60,110 9,175
Total 142,795 21,794 182,928 27,921
 
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The following table presents certain consolidated balance sheets data as of the dates indicated.
As of December 31,
As of March 31,
2018
2019
2020
2021
RMB
RMB
RMB
US$
RMB
US$
(in thousands)
Selected Consolidated Balance Sheets Data:
Cash and cash equivalents
70,192 1,296,215 8,938,341 1,364,258 6,070,720 926,573
Restricted cash
25,000 140,027 1,234,178 188,372 2,111,642 322,300
Time deposits and short-term investments
859,913 2,272,653 19,701,382 3,007,017 22,175,797 3,384,688
Total assets
5,780,940 9,513,422 36,373,276 5,551,644 37,744,141 5,760,882
Total liabilities
2,977,676 4,932,291 6,569,679 1,002,727 8,011,481 1,222,791
Total mezzanine equity
5,199,039 10,255,662
Total shareholders’ (deficit)/equity
(2,395,775) (5,674,531) 29,803,597 4,548,917 29,732,660 4,538,091
Total liabilities, mezzanine equity and shareholders’ (deficit)/equity
5,780,940 9,513,422 36,373,276 5,551,644 37,744,141 5,760,882
The following table presents certain consolidated cash flow data for the periods indicated.
For the Year Ended December 31,
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
2018
2019
2020
2020
2021
RMB
RMB
RMB
US$
RMB
RMB
US$
(in thousands)
(unaudited)
Selected Consolidated
Cash Flow Data:
Net cash (used in)/
provided by operating
activities
(1,346,805) (1,793,710) 3,139,804 479,229 (63,007) 926,343 141,388
Net cash used in investing activities
(191,512) (2,574,836) (18,737,725) (2,859,935) (181,417) (2,892,396) (441,466)
Net cash provided by financing activities
1,108,658 5,655,690 24,710,697 3,771,589 (135,977)
Effects of exchange rate
changes on cash and
cash equivalents and
restricted cash
3,299 53,722 (376,646) (57,487) 4,660 (24,104) (3,679)
Net (decrease)/increase
in cash, cash
equivalents and
restricted cash
(426,360) 1,340,866 8,736,130 1,333,396 (375,741) (1,990,157) (303,757)
Cash, cash equivalents
and restricted cash at
the beginning of the
year/period
521,883 95,523 1,436,389 219,234 1,436,389 10,172,519 1,552,630
Cash, cash equivalents
and restricted cash at
the end of the year/
period
95,523 1,436,389 10,172,519 1,552,630 1,060,648 8,182,362 1,248,873
 
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Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Our Operations
The COVID-19 pandemic has affected China’s automotive industry in general and our Company and our suppliers in particular, resulting in a reduction of vehicles manufactured and delivered in the first quarter of 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the related nationwide precautionary and control measures that were adopted in China starting in January 2020, we postponed the production in our Changzhou manufacturing facility after the Chinese New Year holiday in February 2020 for approximately three weeks, and also experienced short-term delays in our suppliers’ delivery of certain raw materials needed for production ranging from approximately two weeks to two months. As a result of varying levels of travel and other restrictions for public health concerns in various regions of China, we also temporarily postponed the delivery of Li ONE to our users. In addition, we did not open any new retail stores from January 2020 to April 2020. Following this temporary closure in February 2020, we reopened our retail stores and delivery and servicing centers and have resumed vehicle delivery to our users. By the end of March 2020, the business activities of our suppliers had fully recovered and their delivery of raw materials had resumed to the normal level. In May 2020, we started to open new retail stores as the spread of the COVID-19 slowed down in China. The delay in our production ramp-up, expansion of retail stores, and vehicle delivery adversely affected our results of operations for the first quarter of 2020. We did not experience any material cancellation of orders by our users during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Currently, our manufacturing facility has gradually increased its production capacity in accordance with anticipated vehicle delivery based on user orders, and we have not experienced significant constraints on our supply chain or significant increases in our supply costs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Although our vehicle deliveries in the first quarter of 2020 were adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, we achieved satisfactory delivery results in the second, third, and fourth quarter of 2020 and in the first quarter of 2021, as the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic began to alleviate starting from the second quarter of 2020, with most restrictive measures lifted and most of our operations back to the normal level. The total number of vehicles that we delivered in the second quarter of 2020 was 6,604, representing an increase of 128.0% from the first quarter of 2020. The total number of vehicles that we delivered in the third quarter of 2020 was 8,660, representing an increase of 31.1% from the second quarter of 2020. The total number of vehicles that we delivered in the fourth quarter of 2020 was 14,464, representing an increase of 67.0% from the third quarter of 2020. The total number of vehicles that we delivered in the first quarter of 2021 was 12,579, representing an increase of 334.4% from the first quarter of 2020 and a slight decrease of 13.0% from the fourth quarter of 2020. The extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic affects our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows in the future will depend on the future developments of the pandemic, including the duration and severity of the pandemic, the extent and severity of new waves of outbreak in China and other countries, the development and progress of distribution of COVID-19 vaccine and other medical treatment and the effectiveness of such vaccine and other medical treatment, and the actions taken by government authorities to contain the outbreak, all of which are highly uncertain, unpredictable, and beyond our control. In addition, our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows could be adversely affected to the extent that the pandemic harms the Chinese economy in general. As of December 31, 2020 and March 31, 2021, we had a total of RMB29.9 billion (US$4.6 billion) and RMB30.4 billion (US$4.6 billion), respectively, in cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash, and time deposits and short-term investments. We believe that this level of liquidity is sufficient to successfully navigate an extended period of uncertainty.
In light of the uncertainties in the global market and economic conditions attributable to the COVID-19 pandemic, we will continue to evaluate the nature and extent of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic to our financial condition and liquidity. See also “Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Our Business and Industry—Pandemics and epidemics, natural disasters, terrorist activities, political unrest, and other outbreaks could disrupt our production, delivery, and operations, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.” Our directors believe that the COVID-19 pandemic would not materially affect our expansion plan or use of proceeds under the current situation.
 
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USE OF PROCEEDS
We estimate that we will receive net proceeds from the Global Offering of approximately HK$11.6 billion, or US$1.5 billion (or approximately HK$13.3 billion, or US$1.7 billion, if the international underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional Class A ordinary shares in full), after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and the estimated offering expenses payable by us.
The public offering price in the international offering may be higher than, or the same as, the public offering price in the Hong Kong public offering. In addition, the allocation of Class A ordinary shares between the Hong Kong public offering and the international offering is subject to reallocation as described in “Underwriting.”
In line with our strategies, we intend to use our proceeds from the Global Offering for the purposes and in the amounts set forth below:

45% of the net proceeds, or approximately HK$5.2 billion, allocated to research and development in the next 12 to 36 months as follows:
(i)
20% of the net proceeds, or approximately HK$2.3 billion, to fund the research and development of HPC BEV technologies, platforms, and future models, including to fund:
(a)
the development of high C-rate battery, high-voltage platform, and ultra-fast charging technologies, that are necessary for the launch of HPC BEVs. We plan to develop a high C-rate battery to balance cost, longevity, safety, and charging and discharging rate. We are also developing key parts and components of the high-voltage platform, such as the battery pack, battery management system (BMS) application software, electric drive unit (EDU) integration and software, thermal management systems, and other software;
(b)
the development of our HPC BEV platforms, including Whale and Shark platforms, which are foundation platforms for our future HPC BEV models; and
(c)
the development and launch of two HPC BEV models planned for 2023. Our future HPC BEV models would deliver superior charging experience with a significantly shorter charging time. These new HPC BEV models will also allow us to offer more vehicle options within our target price range. We plan to continue to recruit more research and development employees with HPC BEV expertise and partner with our suppliers for vehicle design, validation, and testing;
(ii)
15% of the net proceeds, or approximately HK$1.7 billion, to fund the research and development of intelligent vehicle and autonomous driving technologies, including to fund:
(a)
the enhancement of intelligent vehicle systems, key technologies for next-generation electrical/electronic architecture (EEA) , such as central domain computing platforms, generic zonal domain controller, and ultra-low latency real-time operating system; and
(b)
the enhancement of the current Level 2 autonomous driving technology and the development of the Level 4 autonomous driving technology. We plan to further enhance the Level 2 autonomous driving of our current model through hardware upgrade and software improvement and to equip our future models with necessary hardware compatible with Level 4 autonomous driving as a standard configuration. We plan to continue to optimize our autonomous driving solutions leveraging our full-stack proprietary software development capabilities. We plan to equip our full-size premium smart extended-range electric SUV planned for 2022 with Level 4 autonomous driving hardware as a standard configuration, including the powerful NVIDIA Orin-X SoC chipset with 508 trillion operations per second, high-definition cameras, LiDAR system, millimeter-wave radars, and safety redundant electronic architecture and chassis control system. Intelligent vehicles and autonomous driving technologies present the future trends of the NEV market that we believe are
 
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essential for us to attract and retain users and offer superior driving and riding experience for our users. We plan to recruit more algorithm and software engineers for in-house development of the full-stack ADAS and autonomous driving solutions and partner with leading hardware partners to develop the hardware adaptable for our ADAS and autonomous driving solutions;
(iii)
10% of the net proceeds, or approximately HK$1.2 billion, to fund the research and development of future EREV models in the next 12 to 30 months, including to fund (a) the development of a next-generation EREV platform. Our X platform, which will succeed the existing EREV platform for Li ONE, is planned to be equipped with our next-generation EREV powertrain system; and (b) the development and launch of a new EREV model planned for 2022 and two more planned for 2023. With our next-generation EREV technologies, we aim to support longer range, higher thermal efficiency, and better NVH performance of our EREVs. We plan to enhance the integration of the range extension system and the electric motors to support higher electric power output and better acceleration performance. We also plan to leverage a world-class chassis to support a larger vehicle body and provide optimal driving experience and superior vehicle passing capability. The performance enhancement is expected to enable our products to remain competitive and attract more users;
We plan to recruit more research and development employees for the development of our next generation EREV platform.

45% of the net proceeds, or approximately HK$5.2 billion, to fund infrastructure expansion and marketing and promotion in the next 12 to 36 months as follows:
(i)
25% of the net proceeds, or approximately HK$2.9 billion, to fund the expansion of production capacity. We plan to develop our manufacturing technologies and build a new factory for the production of new vehicles and procurement of relevant machinery for vehicle production:
(a)
To further expand our production capacity and support our increasing vehicle sales volume with future models, we are planning to construct the manufacturing of EREV platform and HPV BEV platform. The production base will house a broad range of functions, including, among others, manufacturing and vehicle testing. We expect to incur capital expenditures primarily on the construction of production plants and purchase of equipment in relation to our new manufacturing facility, as well as mold and tooling for new vehicle models;
(b)
For the existing Changzhou plant, we plan to continuously upgrade and invest in equipment and technological systems to further optimize operating efficiency and product quality. We are planning on the reconfiguration of our Changzhou factory for our new model pipeline, especially the full-size premium SUV based on the X platform to be launched in 2022; and
(c)
We will continue to research and develop advanced manufacturing technologies to enhance the level of automation and ensure better product quality;
(ii)
10% of the net proceeds, or approximately HK$1.2 billion, to fund the expansion of retail stores and delivery and servicing centers. We plan to open more retail stores and delivery and servicing centers in cities with great sales potentials for our products. We plan to increase the density of our stores in top-tier cities and expand our footprint in selected lower tier cities in China. We plan to open retail stores and delivery and servicing centers as on-the-ground outposts for our users mainly through our direct sales model. We plan to authorize and cooperate with third-party body and paint shops to efficiently and effectively extend our service coverage. In the medium term, we plan to double the number of our retail stores;
(iii)
5% of the net proceeds, or approximately HK$0.6 billion, to fund the roll-out of HPC
 
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network. We plan to open and maintain HPC charging network in targeted areas, in order to provide accessible charging facilities for our future HPC BEV models:
(a)
Co-development of HPC charging facilities: co-develop charging stations and energy storage productions based on the definition of HPC charging products that are compatible with BEV platform models, including research and development, procurement of testing equipment, and mold and tooling;
(b)
Laying out HPC charging network: targeting high-frequency usage scenarios by users such as highways and urban areas, we plan to roll-out HPC charging stations in various cities across China and begin setting up charging facilities, procuring charging equipment, obtaining resources and materials for the charging stations, and further investing to enhance charging stations; and
(iv)
5% of the net proceeds, or approximately HK$0.6 billion, to fund marketing and promotion. We plan to launch marketing campaigns and advertising through social media to promote our brand and products. For marketing campaigns, we plan to increase the amount of our branding advertisements to further enhance awareness of our brand as well as to participate in more auto shows to increase our brand exposure. We also plan to organize more offline events, including test drives and community activities for users, to promote our new functions and improve user engagement. For social media advertising, we plan to focus on creating content for marketing on new media and short-video social media platforms with the goal of increasing our product exposure and building our reputation; and

10% of the net proceeds, or approximately HK$1.2 billion, for working capital and other general corporate purposes to support our business operation and growth in the next 12 months.
To the extent that the net proceeds of the Global Offering are not immediately required for the above purposes or if we are unable to put into effect any part of our development plan as intended, we may hold such funds in short-term investments at authorized financial institutions and/or licensed banks. In such event, we will comply with the appropriate disclosure requirements under the Hong Kong Listing Rules.
 
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CAPITALIZATION
The following table sets forth our capitalization as of March 31, 2021:

on an actual basis; and

on an as adjusted basis giving effect to our issuance and sale in the Global Offering of 100,000,000 Class A ordinary shares, resulting in estimated net proceeds of HK$11.6 billion (US$1.5 billion), based on the offer price of HK$118.00 or US$15.18, per share (equivalent to US$30.36 per ADS), after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us, and assuming (i) the option to purchase additional Class A ordinary shares is not exercised and (ii) no adjustment to the allocation of Class A ordinary shares between the Hong Kong public offering and the international offering.
This table should be read in conjunction with, and is qualified in its entirety by reference to, our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus supplement and “Financial Information” in Exhibit 99.1 to the Super 6-K, as amended, which is incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and accompanying prospectus.
As of March 31, 2021
Actual
As Adjusted
RMB
US$
RMB
US$
(in thousands)
Shareholders’ Equity:
Class A ordinary shares (US$0.0001 par value;
4,000,000,000 shares authorized,
1,487,476,230 shares issued and
1,454,109,242 outstanding on an actual
basis; and 1,587,476,230 shares issued and
1,554,109,242 outstanding on an as-adjusted
basis)
1,032 148 1,098 158
Class B ordinary shares (US$0.0001 par value;
500,000,000 shares authorized, 355,812,080
shares issued and outstanding on an actual
basis; and 355,812,080 issued and
outstanding on an as-adjusted basis)
235 36 235 36
Treasury shares
(22) (3) (22) (3)
Additional paid-in capital
37,473,102 5,719,513 47,208,052 7,205,357
Accumulated other comprehensive income
(897,540) (136,982) (897,540) (136,982)
Accumulated deficit
(6,844,147) (1,044,621) (6,844,147) (1,044,621)
Total shareholders’ equity
29,732,660 4,538,091 39,467,676 6,023,945
 
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DILUTION
If you invest in our Class A ordinary shares in the Global Offering, your interest will be diluted to the extent of the difference between the public offering price per Class A ordinary shares and our net tangible book value per Class A ordinary shares after this Global Offering. Dilution results from the fact that the public offering price per Class A ordinary share is substantially in excess of the net tangible book value per ordinary share attributable to the existing shareholders for our presently issued ordinary shares.
Our net tangible book value as of March 31, 2021 was US$4.4 billion, or US$2.45 per ordinary share and US$4.90 per ADS. Net tangible book value represents the amount of our total consolidated tangible assets, less the amount of our total consolidated liabilities. Dilution is determined by subtracting net tangible book value per ordinary share and the additional proceeds we will receive from the Global Offering at an offering price of HK$118.00, or US$15.18, per Class A ordinary share, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us, and assuming the option to purchase additional Class A ordinary shares is not exercised.
Without taking into account any other changes in such net tangible book value after March 31, 2021, other than to give effect to the estimated net proceeds we will receive from the issuance and sale of Class A ordinary shares in the Global Offering at the offering price of HK$118.00, or US$15.18, per Class A ordinary share, after deduction of the underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us, our as adjusted net tangible book value as of March 31, 2021 would have been US$3.10 per outstanding ordinary share, or US$6.20 per ADS. This represents an immediate increase in net tangible book value of US$0.65 per ordinary share and US$1.30 per ADS to the existing shareholders and an immediate dilution in net tangible book value of US$12.08 per ordinary share and US$24.16 per ADS to investors purchasing Class A ordinary shares in the Global Offering.
The following table illustrates such dilution:
Per
Ordinary
Share
Per ADS
US$
US$
Public offering price
15.18 30.36
Actual net tangible book value as of March 31, 2021
2.45 4.90
As adjusted net tangible book value after giving effect to the Global Offering
3.10 6.20
Dilution in net tangible book value to new investors in the Global Offering
12.08 24.16
The amount of dilution in net tangible book value to new investors in the Global Offering set forth above is determined after giving effect to the Global Offering from the public offering price per ordinary share.
If the international underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional Class A ordinary shares the as adjusted net tangible book value would be US$3.19 per ordinary share and US$6.38 per ADS, and the dilution in as adjusted net tangible book value to investors in the Global Offering would be US$11.99 per ordinary share and US$23.98 per ADS.
Translations of U.S. dollars into Hong Kong dollars and from U.S. dollars into Renminbi relating to estimated net proceeds and the offering price were made at HK$7.7746 to US$1.00 and RMB6.5518 to US$1.00, the respective exchange rates on March 31, 2021, as set forth in the H.10 statistical release of The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.
 
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PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS
As of the date of this prospectus supplement, our authorized share capital is US$500,000,000 divided into 5,000,000,000 shares comprising of (i) 4,000,000,000 Class A ordinary shares of a par value of US$0.0001 each, (ii) 500,000,000 Class B ordinary shares of a par value of US$0.0001 each, and (iii) 500,000,000 shares of a par value of US$0.0001 each of such class or classes (however designated) as the board of directors may determine in accordance with our fourth amended and restated memorandum and articles of association. To meet the requirement of the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, our board of directors adopted resolutions to re-designate and re-classify the 500,000,000 undesignated shares into 500,000,000 Class A ordinary shares, effective upon the Listing Date.
Except as specifically noted, the following table sets forth information with respect to the beneficial ownership of our ordinary shares on an as-converted basis as of the date of this prospectus supplement by:

each of our directors and executive officers; and

each person known to us to own beneficially more than 5% of our ordinary shares.
The calculations in the table below are based on 1,487,476,230 Class A ordinary shares and 464,369,480 Class B ordinary shares on an as-converted basis outstanding as of the date of this prospectus supplement, and 1,696,033,630 Class A ordinary shares and 355,812,080 Class B ordinary shares outstanding immediately after the completion of the Global Offering, assuming the option to purchase additional Class A ordinary shares is not exercised.
Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules and regulations of the SEC. In computing the number of shares beneficially owned by a person and the percentage ownership and voting power percentage of that person, we have included shares and associated votes that the person has the right to acquire within 60 days, including through the exercise of any option, warrant or other right or the conversion of any other security. These shares and associated votes, however, are not included in the computation of the percentage ownership of any other person. Ordinary shares held by a shareholder are determined in accordance with our register of members.
Ordinary Shares Beneficially Owned
Prior to the Global Offering
Ordinary Shares Beneficially Owned
Immediately After the Global Offering
Class A
Ordinary
Shares
Class B
Ordinary
Shares
% of
Beneficial
Ownership
% of
Aggregate
Voting
Power††
Class A
Ordinary
Shares
Class B
Ordinary
Shares
% of
Beneficial
Ownership
% of
Aggregate
Voting
Power††
Directors and Executive Officers**:
Xiang Li(1)
464,369,480 23.8% 75.7%(2) 108,557,400 355,812,080 22.6% 69.8%(3)
Yanan Shen(4)
30,000,000 1.5% 0.4% 30,000,000 1.5% 0.6%
Tie Li(5)
22,373,299 1.1% 0.4% 22,373,299 1.1% 0.4%
Donghui Ma
* * * * * *
Kai Wang
Xing Wang(6)
391,434,687 20.1% 6.4% 391,434,687 19.1% 7.5%
Hongqiang Zhao
Zheng Fan(7)
86,978,960 4.5% 1.4% 86,978,960 4.2% 1.7%
Zhenyu Jiang***
Xing Xiao***
All Directors and Executive Officers as a Group
540,786,946 464,369,480 50.6% 84.1% 649,344,346 355,812,080 48.2% 79.6%
 
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Ordinary Shares Beneficially Owned
Prior to the Global Offering
Ordinary Shares Beneficially Owned
Immediately After the Global Offering
Class A
Ordinary
Shares
Class B
Ordinary
Shares
% of
Beneficial
Ownership
% of
Aggregate
Voting
Power††
Class A
Ordinary
Shares
Class B
Ordinary
Shares
% of
Beneficial
Ownership
% of
Aggregate
Voting
Power††
Principal Shareholders:
Amp Lee Ltd.(1)
464,369,480 23.8% 75.7%(2) 108,557,400 355,812,080 22.6% 69.8%(3)
Zijin Global Inc.(6)
133,263,086 6.8% 2.2% 133,263,086 6.5% 2.5%
Inspired Elite Investments Limited(8)
258,171,601 13.2% 4.2% 258,171,601 12.6% 4.9%
Notes:
*
Less than 1% of our total outstanding shares.
**
Except for Xing Wang, Hongqiang Zhao, Zhenyu Jiang, and Xing Xiao, the business address of our directors and executive officers is 11 Wenliang Street Shunyi District, Beijing 101399, People’s Republic of China. The business address of Mr. Xing Wang is Block B&C, No.4 Wang Jing East Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China. The business address of Mr. Hongqiang Zhao is No. 10 Furong Street, Block A, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China. The business address of Mr. Zhenyu Jiang is Floor 1, Building 14, No. 36, Chuangyuan Road, Chaolai High-Technology Industry Zone, Chaoyang Disctrict, Beijing, China. The business address of Prof. Xing Xiao is School of Economics and Management, Tshinghua University, 30 Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, Beijing, China.
***
Each of Zhenyu Jiang and Xing Xiao has accepted the appointment as our independent director, effective upon the Listing Date.

For each person and group included in this column, percentage ownership is calculated by dividing the number of shares beneficially owned by such person or group by the sum of the total number of shares outstanding and the number of shares such person or group has the right to acquire upon exercise of option, warrant or other right within 60 days after the date of this prospectus supplement. The total number of ordinary shares outstanding as of the date of this prospectus supplement is 1,951,845,710. The total number of ordinary shares outstanding after the completion of the Global Offering will be 2,051,845,710, including Class A ordinary shares to be sold by us in the Global Offering, assuming that the option to purchase additional Class A ordinary shares is not exercised.
††
For each person and group included in this column, percentage of voting power is calculated by dividing the voting power beneficially owned by such person or group by the voting power of all of our Class A and Class B ordinary shares as a single class. Each holder of Class B ordinary shares is entitled to ten votes per share, subject to certain conditions, and each holder of our Class A ordinary shares is entitled to one vote per share on all matters submitted to them for a vote. Our Class A ordinary shares and Class B ordinary shares vote together as a single class on all matters submitted to a vote of our shareholders, except as may otherwise be required by law. Our Class B ordinary shares are convertible at any time by the holder thereof into Class A ordinary shares on a one-for-one basis.